Importation and Exportation of Cannabis, Controlled Substances and Precursors
Memorandum D19-9-2

ISSN 2369-2391

Ottawa, October 17, 2018

This document is also available in PDF (209 Kb) [help with PDF files]

In Brief

1. Health Canada is responsible for the administration of the Cannabis Act and its regulations (with the exception of regulations pertaining to police enforcement), and the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) provides supporting activities to prevent and interdict prohibited cross-border movement of cannabis while maintaining the flow of legitimate travellers and goods.

2. The CBSA assists Health Canada with the administration of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations (which include Part G and Part J of the Food and Drug Regulations). This memorandum outlines the pertinent regulatory requirements and each organization’s roles and responsibilities associated with the import and export of controlled substances and precursors (including transit and transhipment) regulated under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.

3. This memorandum replaces D19-9-2, Regulations of Narcotics and Controlled and Restricted Drugs (Narcotic Control Act, Food and Drugs Act) dated July 26, 1993 and updates the earlier version of this memorandum dated September 5, 2014.

4. This memorandum does not include the policy and procedures related to the importation and exportation of drugs regulated under the Food and Drugs Act and its regulations (please refer to Memorandum D19-9-1); however, this memorandum replaces the portions of Memorandum D19-9-1 that pertain to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.

5. Should there be inconsistencies or conflicts between the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act or the regulations made under it and the Food and Drug Act or the regulations made under it, section 58 of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act stipulates that the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations should prevail.

1.   The Cannabis Act and its regulations (not pertaining to police enforcement) are administered by Health Canada, and establish a legislative framework to provide restricted access to cannabis and control its production, distribution, sale, import, export and possession. Under the Cannabis Act, it is illegal to import into Canada, or export from Canada, cannabis without a valid permit or exemption, issued by Health Canada. The illegal importation and exportation of cannabis is a serious offence.

2.   The Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and its regulations are administered by Health Canada, and establish a legislative framework that regulates the possession, import, export, production, assembly, distribution, sale, transport, provision, sending and delivery of controlled substances and precursors that can be used in the manufacture of illegal drugs. All activities are prohibited unless authorized by the Act, regulation or exemption. The various regulations under the CDSA set out the circumstances under which legitimate activities with controlled substances and precursors are permitted.

3.   For the purposes of this memorandum, unless otherwise specified, the term “controlled substance” refers to the substances listed in Schedules I to V to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act including narcotics, restricted drugs, controlled drugs, benzodiazepines, and targeted substances. The term “precursor” refers to any of the substances that are listed in Schedule VI to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.

4.   This memorandum outlines the regulatory requirements pertaining to the importation and exportation of cannabis, controlled substances and precursors. It also provides general information on cannabis and some controlled substances of interest, and appropriate contact information that CBSA personnel can use to obtain additional information on issues pertaining to the import or export of cannabis, controlled substances and precursors.

Legislation

The following list identifies the relevant legislation and guidance documentation pertaining to this memorandum:

Customs Act
Cannabis Act
Cannabis Regulations
Industrial Hemp Regulations
Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
Benzodiazepines and Other Targeted Substances Regulations
Narcotic Control Regulations
Precursor Control Regulations
Parts G and J of the Food and Drug Regulations
Medical Devices Regulations

Section 56 Class Exemption for Travellers Who Are Importing or Exporting Prescription Drug Products Containing a Narcotic or Controlled Drug

Section 56 Class Exemption for the Disposal of Seized or Acquired Class A Precursors by Officers of the Canada Border Services Agency

Guidelines and General Information

Acronyms and Definitions

1. For the purposes of this document:

BOTSR:
Benzodiazepines and Other Targeted Substances Regulations
CA:
Cannabis Act
CBSA:
Canada Border Services Agency
CDSA:
Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
CFIA:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency
CR:
Cannabis Regulations
CSD:
Controlled Substances Directorate
FDA:
Food and Drugs Act
FDR:
Food and Drug Regulations
IHR:
Industrial Hemp Regulations
NCR:
Narcotic Control Regulations
OCS:
Office of Controlled Substances
ORT:
Opioid Response Team
PCR:
Precursor Control Regulations
THC:
delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol.
"cannabis"
means a cannabis plant and anything set out in Schedule 1 but does not include anything referred to in Schedule 2 of the Cannabis Act.
“cannabis plant”
means a plant that belongs to the genus Cannabis, as defined in Section 2 of the Cannabis Act.
"Class A precursor"
means,
  • (a) any substance set out in Part 1 of Schedule VI to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act; and
  • (b) any preparation or mixture referred to in Part 3 of Schedule VI to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act that contains a substance referred to in paragraph (a); (PCR – SOR/2002-359, s.1.)
"Class B precursor"
means,
  • (a) any substance set out in Part 2 of Schedule VI to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act; and
  • (b) any preparation or mixture referred to in Part 3 of Schedule VI to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act that contains a substance referred to in paragraph (a); (PCR – SOR/2002-359, s.1.)
"controlled substance"
means a substance included in Schedule I, II, III, IV or V of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act; for the purposes of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act,
  • (a) a reference to a controlled substance includes a reference to any substance that contains a controlled substance; and,
  • (b) a reference to a controlled substance includes a reference to:
    • (i) all synthetic or natural forms of the substance, and
    • (ii) anything that contains or has on it a controlled substance and that is used or intended for use
      • A. in producing the substance, or
      • B. in introducing the substance into a human body.

(CSTD – S.C. 1996 c.19, s.2.)

"controlled drug"
means a drug set out in the schedule to Part G of the Food and Drug Regulations and includes a preparation; (FDR, C.R.C., c.870, s.G.01.001.)
"drug"
under the Food and Drugs Act, includes any substance or mixture of substances manufactured, sold or represented for use in,
  • (a) the diagnosis, treatment, mitigation or prevention of a disease, disorder or abnormal physical state, or its symptoms, in human beings or animals,
  • (b) restoring, correcting or modifying organic functions in human beings or animals, or
  • (c) disinfection in premises in which food is manufactured, prepared or kept; (FDA – R.S.C. 1985, c. F-27, s.2.)
"industrial hemp"
as defined in the Industrial Hemp Regulations, means a cannabis plant — or any part of that plant — in which the concentration of THC is 0.3% w/w or less in the flowering heads and leaves; (IHR – SOR/2018-145, s.1.)
"narcotic"
means any substance set out in the schedule or anything that contains any substance set out in the schedule of the Narcotic Control Regulations; (NCR – C.R.C., c.1041, s.2.)
"precursor"
means a substance included in Schedule VI of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act; (CDSA – S.C.1996 c.19, s.2.)
"restricted drug"
means a drug set out in the schedule to Part J of the Food and Drug Regulations; (FDR – C.R.C., c.870, s.J.01.001.)
"targeted substance"
means a controlled substance included in Schedule 1 of the Benzodiazepines and Other Targeted Substances Regulations, or a product or compound that contains the controlled substance; (BOTSR – SOR/2000-217, s.1(1))
"test kit"
means an apparatus as defined in the following regulations:

NCR – s.2; BOTSR – s.1(1); Part G – FDR – s.G.01.001(1); Part J – FDR – s.J.01.001;
CR – SOR/2018-144 s. 2

"transhipment"
means, in respect of a targeted substance scheduled in the Benzodiazepines and Other Targeted Substances Regulations or a Class A precursor scheduled in Schedule VI of the CDSA, that has been unloaded or in any way removed from the means of transportation by which it came into Canada, its loading or placing on board or within or on the same or any other means of transportation used for its departure from Canada. (BOTSR – SOR/2000-217, s.1 and PCR – SOR/2002-359, s.1.)

Role of the Canada Border Services Agency

2. The CBSA assists Health Canada in controlling the importation and exportation of cannabis, controlled substances, and precursors. The CBSA may detain a shipment in order to verify whether a specific restriction or prohibition immediately applies and to confirm that the shipment complies with any related obligation, such as permit requirements. In doing so, advice from Health Canada may be sought.

3. In cases where the Customs Act has been contravened, CBSA may seize the shipment.

Role of Health Canada

4. The Office of Controlled Substances (OCS) of the Controlled Substances Directorate (CSD), Opioid Response Team (ORT), and the Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Branch (CLRB) are responsible for the administration and administrative enforcement of the CDSA and the Cannabis Act, respectively, and associated regulations via the following activities as applicable:

Categories of Controlled Substances and Precursors

5. Controlled substances are listed in Schedules I through V of the CDSA. These substances are also divided into different categories by the various regulations pursuant to the CDSA. A brief overview of certain categories follows:

Cannabis

6. Cannabis includes the substances listed in Schedule 1 of the Cannabis Act, but does not include anything referred to in Schedule 2. These schedules are as follows:

Personal Importation and Exportation

7. Personal importation or exportation is described as the import or export of a limited quantity of cannabis, a controlled substance or a precursor by an individual. An individual may only import or export a prescription drug product containing a controlled substance or cannabis for their own continued medical use, or for a person or an animal for whom they are responsible and who is travelling with them, when it is specifically authorised by regulation or when there is an applicable exemption.

8.   The requirements regarding personal importation and exportation of controlled substances and precursors are outlined specifically in the Benzodiazepines and Other Targeted Substances Regulations (BOTSR), the Precursor Control Regulations (PCR) and in the Section 56 Class Exemption for Travellers Who Are Importing or Exporting Prescription Drug Products Containing a Narcotic or Controlled Drug.

9.   An individual cannot import or export controlled substances or precursors listed in Schedules I through VI by mail or by courier without a valid permit, or an exemption.

10. Exemptions for the personal importation and/or exportation of cannabis may be granted on a case by case basis under section 140 of the Cannabis Act if the Minister of Health is of the opinion that the exemption is necessary for a medical or scientific purpose or is otherwise in the public interest.

Note: Section 56 class exemptions issued under CDSA for the importation of prescription products containing cannabis (i.e. Charlotte’s Web Oil) will remain valid until the expiry date of the exemption unless revoked. If the expiry date is between coming into force (or immediately before) and , the exemption will continue to be valid until .

11. Requirements for personal importation or exportation are listed in Appendix A.

Commercial Importation and Exportation

12. Under the CDSA, importation and exportation are considered to be illegal unless otherwise authorized by regulation or an exemption. In general, as summarized in Appendix B, controlled substances or precursors may only be imported or exported into Canada by a licensed dealer, licensed producer or registered dealer and each shipment must be accompanied by a valid import or export permit.

13. Under the Cannabis Act, importation and exportation are illegal unless otherwise authorized by regulation, exemption or permit.

14. All permits carry an issuance and expiry date and are only valid for a onetime specific shipment of a controlled substance, cannabis or a precursor.

15. Requirements for commercial importation or exportation are listed in Appendix B.

Special Exemptions

16. In special circumstances (humanitarian missions) or for specific events (international sporting events), a Section 56 class exemption is issued to allow the importation or exportation of controlled substances or precursors.

Test Kits/Precursors Authorization Certificates

17. Test kits containing controlled substances included in the schedules to either the NCR, BOTSR, Part G or Part J of the FDR can be imported or exported from Canada without a permit but must be registered with Health Canada. The test kits being imported or exported must bear on their external packaging the name of the manufacturer, the trade name or trade mark and the test kit registration number issued by Health Canada which is preceded by the letters “TK”. Registration numbers for test kits containing cannabis that were issued under the NCR are deemed to be issued under the Cannabis Regulations pursuant to subsection 159(6) of the Cannabis Act. (Note: Please refer to the BOTSR for broader requirements that apply to test kits containing benzodiazepines and/or targeted substances.)

18. Precursor authorization certificates are issued under section 49 of the PCR for a preparation or mixture which can be imported or exported from Canada without a permit but must be issued a precursor authorization certificate. The Class A import and export shipment and Class B export shipment must be accompanied by a document containing a statement that the preparation or mixture is subject to an authorization certificate under section 49 or 77 and the certificate number for the preparation or mixture.

19. Test kits containing cannabis can be imported or exported from Canada without a permit but must be registered with Health Canada. The test kits imported or exported must have a registration number issued for the test kit that has not been cancelled, and must adhere to the label requirements set out in the Cannabis Regulations. A test kit that is subject to the labelling requirements of the Medical Devices Regulations must include the registration number on the label. In the case of a test kit that is not subject to the labelling requirements of the Medical Devices Regulations, the label must include the registration number, brand name and the name and address of the manufacturer or assembler or, if applicable, the name and address of the person for which the test kit was manufactured or assembled further to a custom order. The test kit must be imported or exported for a medical, laboratory, industrial, educational, law administration or enforcement, or research purpose. (CR - SOR/2018-144 s.255)

First Aid Kits: Aircrafts and Ships

20. First aid kits containing small amounts of narcotics, controlled drugs, benzodiazepines, and/or prescription drugs containing cannabis which are sealed and for emergency use only on aircraft or ships, shall not be subject to control procedures for CBSA purposes under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Food and Drugs Act or the Cannabis Act.

Special Substances of Interest

21. The following describes several substances of interest in relation to their movement across the Canadian border.

Cannabis

22. Under the Cannabis Act, a valid permit or exemption issued by Health Canada is required for any (personal or commercial) importation or exportation of cannabis across Canada’s border. Without a valid permit or exemption it is illegal to import or export cannabis.

23. Licences and permits authorizing the importation or exportation of cannabis may be issued on a case by case basis only in respect of cannabis for medical or scientific purposes or in respect of industrial hemp; (Cannabis Act subsection 62(2)). In general, only a person holding a licence under the Cannabis Act may import or export cannabis and must hold a permit for each shipment.

24. On request of an officer, a person reporting exported goods must present the goods to the officer (subsection 95(3) Customs Act). The exporter of cannabis must provide evidence that its exportation complies with the Cannabis Act to the chief officer of customs in accordance with the provisions of the Reporting of Exported Goods Regulations, and the goods made available for inspection.

25. Exemptions for the importation and/or exportation of cannabis may be granted under section 140 of the Cannabis Act if the Minister is of the opinion that the exemption is necessary for a medical or scientific purpose or is otherwise in the public interest.

26. Non-viable (unable to grow) cannabis seed of a cannabis plant, a mature cannabis stalk (without any leaf, flower, seed or branch) of such a plant or fibre derived therefrom, or the root or any part of the root of such a plant as described in Schedule 2 of the Cannabis Act are excluded from the definition of “cannabis” in section 2 of the Cannabis Act and are therefore not subject to the prohibitions of import and export pursuant to s. 11(1) and (2) of the Cannabis Act.

27. Cannabis may be subject to additional requirements under CFIA legislation. Please consult Memorandum D19-1-1, Food, Plants, Animals and Related Products and the CFIA’s Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) for more information.

Hemp Seed and Hemp Derivatives

28. Derivatives of industrial hemp, or a product made from these derivatives as specified under the Industrial Hemp Regulations (IHR) can be imported or exported without a licence or permit provided that the shipment is accompanied by a certificate of analysis from a competent laboratory in the country of origin of the derivative or product stating that the derivative or product contains a concentration of 10μg/g THC or less.

29. Hemp products may be subject to additional requirements under CFIA legislation. Please consult Memorandum D19-1-1, Food, Plants, Animals and Related Products and the CFIA’s Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) for more information.

Opium Poppy

30. Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum), its preparations, derivatives, alkaloids and salts are included in Schedule I of the CDSA. Only licensed dealers under the NCR are allowed to import or export opium, its preparations, derivatives, alkaloids and/or salts with a valid permit.

31.   Poppy seeds however are not subject to the CDSA or its regulations, and therefore do not require import or export permits. Additional requirements may need to be met with respect to the importation of poppy seeds as specified under the Seeds Regulations. Please consult Memorandum D19-1-1, Food, Plants, Animals and Related Products and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) Automated Import Reference System (AIRS) for more information.

Catha edulis Forsk (Khat), Cathine and Cathinone

32. Catha edulis forsk (Khat), its preparations, derivatives, alkaloids and salts, cathine and cathinone are scheduled under the CDSA; however, they are not scheduled under any regulation. Importation and exportation of these substances is illegal. An exemption is required for any importation or exportation of these substances.

Precursors

33. In accordance with the PCR, the following exemptions are listed directly in the regulations. The onus is on the importer or exporter of record to prove that they meet the requirements.

34. For Class A precursors: A person who imports or exports a Class A precursor that is a preparation or mixture is exempt from the requirements of these regulations, if

35. For Class B precursors: A person who imports or exports a Class B precursor that is a preparation or mixture is exempt from the requirements of these regulations, if the preparation or mixture contains a precursor set out in Part 2 of Schedule VI to the Act and the contained precursor, either alone or with any other precursor of the same type, does not constitute more than 30% of the preparation or mixture by weight or volume, in the case of a solid or liquid, respectively.

Detention and Seizures

36. CBSA officers may detain any suspect shipments in order to verify whether a specific restriction or prohibition immediately applies and to check that shipments are in compliance with any related obligation, such as permit requirements. CBSA officers may seize goods under the Customs Act if there has been a contravention of the Customs Act or its regulations.

37. Health Canada can be contacted to ensure the requirements for the importation or exportation of cannabis, controlled substances or precursors are being met. Health Canada contact information for importers and the public is listed in Additional Information below. The CBSA should contact the Health Canada Border Centre for their region.

Disposal

38. Cannabis, controlled substances, and precursors that are seized, found or otherwise acquired by the CBSA will be disposed of in accordance with the direction contained in the CBSA Comptrollership Manual - Material Management Volume, and the Section 56 Class Exemption for the Disposal of Seized or Acquired Class A Precursors by Officers of the Canada Border Services Agency.

Additional Information

39. You may contact your local regional Health Canada office or by calling toll free 1-800-267-9675 during local regular business hours for additional information regarding administration of the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act or the Cannabis Act.

40. For more information, within Canada call the Border Information Service at 1-800-461-9999. From outside Canada call 204-983-3500 or 506-636-5064. Long distance charges will apply. Agents are available Monday to Friday (08:00 – 16:00 local time/except holidays). TTY is also available within Canada: 1-866-335-3237.

Appendix A

Requirements for Personal Importation or Exportation
Substance Method of Importation or Exportation Permitted Activities
Narcotics as set out in the schedule to the Narcotics Control Regulations In person In accordance with the Section 56 Class Exemption for Travellers Who Are Importing or Exporting Prescription Drug Products Containing a Narcotic or Controlled Drug, individuals may import or export a controlled drug or narcotic if the following conditions are met:
  • The controlled drug or narcotic was obtained under a prescription and is contained in pharmacy or hospital dispensed packaging with appropriate labelling;
  • The individual is importing or exporting the controlled drug or narcotic for their own use, or for the use of a person for whom they are responsible and who is travelling with them, and when the controlled drug or narcotic meets the medical need(s) for which it has been prescribed;
  • The quantity imported or exported of the controlled drug or narcotic does not exceed the lesser of a single course of treatment or a 30-day supply based on the usual daily dose prescribed;
  • The controlled drug or narcotic is in the possession of the individual at the time of entry or departure;
  • In the case of import, the controlled drug or narcotic must be declared to a CBSA officer at the point of entry into Canada and at the time of import; and
  • In the case of export, the exportation of the controlled drug or narcotic must not contravene the laws and regulations of the country of destination.

This exemption does not apply to the importation or exportation of narcotics or controlled drugs for animals.
This exemption does not apply to products containing substances listed in Annex I to this exemption, unless they have been approved by Health Canada for market in Canada under the FDR or approved for market in the country from which the product is being imported by the corresponding regulatory authority of that country.

Controlled drugs as set out in the schedule to Part G of the Food and Drug Regulations In person Same as above
Restricted drugs as set out in the schedule to Part J of the Food and Drug Regulations Not applicable There is no provision in regulation or under the Section 56 Class exemption to allow an individual to import/export a restricted drug.

Benzodiazepines and other targeted substances as listed in the schedules to the Benzodiazepine and Other Targeted Substances Regulations

Reference: Sections 68-69 of the BOTSR

In person Canadian Residents
  • May import or export a benzodiazepine or other targeted substance that was obtained by prescription and is labelled accordingly and does not exceed the lesser of a single course of treatment or a 90-day supply based on the usual daily dose; and
  • The individual is importing or exporting the benzodiazepine or targeted substance for their own use, for the use of a person for whom they are responsible and is travelling with them, or for the use of an animal for whom they are responsible and is travelling with them; and
  • The benzodiazepine or targeted substance meets the medical needs of the individual or animal for whose benefit it was prescribed; and
  • The benzodiazepine or targeted substance must be declared to a CBSA officer at the port of entry into Canada at the time of import.

Foreign Residents
Same conditions apply as for Canadian residents but in the case of an import the quantity imported must be the lesser of the contents of the container, a 90-day supply based on the usual daily dose, or the usual daily dose multiplied by the number of days the individual plans stay in Canada.

Precursor chemicals as listed in the schedule to the Precursor Control Regulations

Reference: Section 11 of the PCR

In person Individuals may import or export a Class A precursor that is a preparation or mixture if the following requirements are met:
  • The preparation or mixture is intended to treat a medical condition of the individual or an accompanying person for whom they are responsible;
  • If the precursor is a preparation or mixture of ephedra, ephedrine or pseudoephedrine and is packaged and labelled as a consumer product and the total quantity per package does not exceed 20g of ephedra, 0.4g of ephedrine and/or 3g of pseudoephedrine; and
  • If the precursor is a preparation or mixture containing ergometrine or ergotamine and is packaged and labelled showing it was dispensed under prescription in a pharmacy or hospital or by a physician and the total quantity does not exceed the lesser of a single prescribed course of treatment or a 90-day supply based on the normal daily dose for the precursor.
Industrial hemp as defined in the Industrial Hemp Regulations Not applicable. There is no provision in regulation or under the Section 56 Class exemption to allow an individual to import/export industrial hemp.
Cannabis as defined in the Cannabis Act In person (as per the exemption for prescription products containing cannabis) Exemptions allowing the importation and/or exportation of cannabis may be granted under section 140 of the Cannabis Act.

Appendix B

Requirements for Commercial Importation or Exportation
Substance Licence/Permit Required Import/Export Requirements
Narcotics as listed in the schedule to the Narcotic Control Regulations

Reference: Sections 8, 10, 14 and 21 of the NCR
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Licence
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Import/Export Permit
No licensed dealer may import or export a narcotic without a permit. Permits are only valid for one shipment of the narcotic(s) and amount(s) may not exceed the amount specified on the permit.
The narcotic may only be imported into or exported out of Canada at the port of entry and to the place specified on the permit.
Controlled drugs as listed in the schedule to Part G of the Food and Drug Regulations

Reference: Sections G.02.001, G.02.008, G.02.012 and G.02.020
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Licence
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Import/Export Permit
No licensed dealer may import or export a controlled drug without a permit;
  • Permits are only valid for one shipment of the controlled drug(s) and amount(s) may not exceed the amount specified on the permit.
  • The controlled drug may only be imported into or exported out of Canada at the port of entry and to the place specified on the permit.
Restricted drugs as listed in the schedule to Part J of the Food and Drug Regulations

Reference: Sections J.01.003, J.01.004, J.01.005 and J.01.014
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Licence
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Import/Export Permit
No licensed dealer may import or export a restricted drug without a permit;
  • Permits are only valid for one shipment of the narcotic(s) and amount(s) may not exceed the amount specified on the permit.
  • The narcotic may only be imported into or exported out of Canada at the port of entry and to the place specified on the permit.
Benzodiazepines and other targeted substances as listed in the schedules to the Benzodiazepine and Other Targeted Substances Regulations

Reference: Sections 15, 37, 39, 43, 45 and 78
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Licence
  • Controlled Drugs and Substances Import/Export Permit
  • Transit or Transhipment Permit
No licensed dealers may import or export benzodiazepines or other targeted substances without a permit;
  • Permits are only valid for one shipment of the benzodiazepine(s) or other targeted substance(s) and amount(s) may not exceed the amount specified on the permit.
  • The benzodiazepine(s) or other targeted substance(s) may only be imported into or exported out of Canada to the place specified on the permit.
  • Transit or transhipment permits for benzodiazepine(s) or other targeted substance(s) are only valid for one transit or transhipment of the benzodiazepine(s) or other targeted substance(s) and amount(s) may not exceed the amount specified on the permit.
Precursor as in listed in the schedule to the Precursor Control Regulations

Reference: Sections 6, 7, 10.1, 26, 28, 33, 35, 40, 42, 57, 57.1, 70, 72, 77 and 79
  • Class A Precursor Licence or Class B Precursor Registration
  • Import or Export Permit for a Class A Precursor
  • Transit or Transhipment Permit for Class A Precursor
  • Export Permit for a Class B Precursor (in specific cases)
Note: Class B precursors do not require an import permit, but the importer must hold a valid Class B registration and be listed as the importer of record.
No licensed dealer may import or export a Class A precursor without a permit;
  • Permits are only valid for one shipment of the Class A precursor(s) and amount(s) may not exceed the amount specified on the permit.
  • The Class A precursor(s) may only be imported into or exported out of Canada to the place specified on the permit.
  • Permits for a Class A precursor(s) must be surrendered to a CBSA officer at the point of entry or exit.
  • Transit or transhipment permits for Class A precursor(s) are only valid for one transit or transhipment of the precursor(s) and amount(s) may not to exceed the amount specified on the permit.
  • Transit or transhipment permits for a Class A precursor(s) must be surrendered to a CBSA officer at the point of entry and exit.
Only a registered dealer may import or export a Class B precursor
  • Class B precursors do not require an import permit
  • Export permits are only valid for one shipment of the Class B precursor(s) and amount(s) not to exceed the amount specified on the permit.
  • Export permits for a Class B precursor(s) must be surrendered to a CBSA at the point of exit.
  • Certain countries require pre-export notification prior to the export of select Class B precursors. These countries are listed on the HC website.
Industrial hemp as defined in the Industrial Hemp Regulations

Reference: Sections 2, 3, 8, 9, 12, 13, 18, 19, and 22
  • Industrial Hemp Licence
  • Import or Export Permit
No holder of an industrial hemp licence may import or export industrial hemp without a permit;
  • Permits are only valid for one shipment of industrial hemp and amount(s) may not to exceed the amount specified on the permit.
  • Industrial hemp may only be imported into or exported out of Canada at the port and to the place specified on the permit.
Cannabis as defined in the Cannabis Act

Reference: Sections 203-220 of the Cannabis Regulations
  • Licence issued under subsection 62(1) of the CA in relation to cannabis
  • Import or Export Permit
No holder of a licence may import or export cannabis without a permit;
  • Permits are valid only for the importation for which it was issued and amount(s) may not exceed the amount specified on the permit.
  • The cannabis may only be imported into or exported out of Canada at the port of entry and to the place specified on the permit.

References

Issuing office
Compliance Unit
Compliance and Program Management Division
Programs Branch
Headquarters file
 
Legislative references
Customs Act
Controlled Drugs and Substances Act
Benzodiazepines and Other Targeted Substances Regulations
Narcotic Control Regulations
Precursor Control Regulations
Cannabis Act
Cannabis Regulations
Industrial Hemp Regulations
Food and Drug Regulations
Medical Devices Regulations
Other references
D19-1-1, D19-9-1
Superseded memorandum D
D19-9-2 dated September 5, 2014
Date modified: