Notice: Cannabis

Despite the fact that cannabis (marijuana) is legal and regulated in Canada, it remains illegal to transport cannabis in any form – including any oils containing THC or cannabidiol (CBD), across Canada’s national borders whether you are entering or leaving Canada. Additionally, receiving or sending cannabis in any form into or out of Canada by mail or courier is also illegal. Unauthorized purchases from outside Canada (online or other) will be confiscated at the border and may lead to arrest and criminal prosecution

For more information, consult cannabis (marijuana) legalization.

Importing goods by courier

If your goods are for personal use, your courier company may take care of the customs details for you. Verify the shipping and handling fees that may apply prior to completing your purchase.

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) screens all goods coming into Canada and examines more closely those that may pose a threat to the safety of Canadians. The Agency uses risk management principles to expedite international trade mail without compromising the safety and security of Canadians.

The CBSA screens mail for multiple reasons, including:

The Agency is committed to facilitating the free flow and legitimate trade of low risk goods, while protecting local communities from illicit goods.

Process for international mail and parcels (Canada Post)

  1. Step 1 Mail items presented by Canada Post
  2. Step 2 Primary inspection
  3. Step 3 Secondary inspection or package released
  4. Step 4 Enforcement action / seizure or package released

Detailed diagram

Step 1

Mail items presented by Canada Post

Upon arrival in Canada, all international mail items are presented by Canada Post to the CBSA for processing (6 days a week from to (local time)). CBSA mail processing centres are located in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal.

Step 2

Primary inspection

Border Services Officers (BSOs) examine mail to determine admissibility and identify goods subject to duties or taxes. BSOs select items that are potentially high-risk and require a more in-depth examination based on indicators.

Step 3

Package cleared

If the BSO determines that a mail item is not high-risk or prohibited from entering Canada and is not subject to duties or taxes, the item is released to Canada Post for delivery.

Most parcels/letters are released after initial inspection.

OR

Secondary inspection

If there are concerns that the item may be inadmissible, wrongly labeled or contain contraband it will be referred for further inspection. Depending on the nature of the item, this secondary inspection will either be conducted by the CBSA or by another government department or agency (Health Canada, CFIA, etc.) before it can continue in the postal process.

Step 4

Package cleared

If after secondary examination a good is found to be admissible and once the appropriate duties and taxes are applied, it will be released to Canada Post for delivery.

OR

Enforcement action / seizure

In cases where prohibited goods are detected, the CBSA will take appropriate enforcement action.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the average time to process a package?

Times for packages to clear customs vary. Most parcels and letters are released after initial inspection, meaning it can take less than a day from the time the item is presented to the CBSA to the time it is released to Canada Post.

However, based on multiple factors and a risk-management approach, the CBSA may require time to further inspect and process the good which may include referring it to the proper authorities (Health Canada, CFIA, etc.) for their review. The time to complete the secondary inspection varies on a case by case basis.

My Canada Post tracking number shows the status as "Item presented to the CBSA for customs review," can you please provide a status update on my packages status?

The CBSA is unable to provide a precise tracking of parcels being processed. The Agency works to clear all packages as quickly as possible. Delays can occur due to the package itself, its documentation or volumes at customs.

For multiple days my tracking information has shown "Item presented to the CBSA for customs review," does that mean it is still under control of the CBSA?

While the item may still be under inspection by the CBSA or another government department, there is a chance the package may have been released to Canada Post and is being processed.

Does the CBSA process mail 7 days a week, 24 hours a day?

The Agency processes international mail 6 days a week from to (local time) at three CBSA mail centres across Canada (Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal).

Does the CBSA increase staff or operational levels during peak periods, like Christmas, to process the increased numbers of packages?

The CBSA is well equipped to address volumes. The Agency routinely monitors operations and makes adjustments to staffing levels based on the forecasted growth in e-commerce, seasonal volumes and arrival patterns.

Declaration of goods

When a good is mailed to Canada from abroad, the sender completes a customs declaration form which outlines the information found within Appendix C of D5-1-1, Canada Border Services Agency International Mail Processing System.

Did You Know? A proper declaration must be made on any items being imported by mail. This not only allows the CBSA to correctly assess the imported goods, but will help speed up the clearance process for the parcel.

Duties and taxes

The CBSA collects duty and taxes on imported items (including all online shopping), on behalf of the Government of Canada.

Duties and taxes apply to all international goods imported by mail that exceed the $20 exemption. If you owe duty and/or tax, it will be indicated on Form E14, CBSA Postal Import Form, which will be attached to your mail item when it is delivered.

Note: Canada Post charges a handling fee to process goods imported by mail that is subject to duty and/or tax. If the item is duty-free and tax exempt, no amount is charged.

More information

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