Departmental Plan 2018-2019
Supplementary Information Tables

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

The CBSA provides integrated border services that support national security priorities and facilitate the flow of people and goods across the border.

Mandate and role

The CBSA, established by the Canada Border Services Act, is an integral part of the Public Safety Portfolio, which is responsible for integrated national security, emergency management, law enforcement, corrections, crime prevention and border management operations. Specific responsibilities of the CBSA include the following:

Examples of Acts Administered by the CBSA

  • Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative Monetary Penalties Act
  • Citizenship Act
  • Criminal Code
  • Customs Act
  • Customs Tariff
  • Excise Act
  • Excise Tax Act
  • Export and Import Permits Act
  • Food and Drug Act
  • Health of Animals Act
  • Immigration and Refugee Protection Act
  • Plant Protection Act
  • Special Import Measures Act

CBSA Service Points

The CBSA provides services at multiple points across Canada and abroad, including the following:

  • 117 land border crossings
  • 70 sufferance warehouses
  • 27 rail offices
  • 221 airports
  • 417 marine reporting sites
  • 11 ferry terminals
  • 10 cruise ship operations
  • 211 commercial vessel clearance facilities
  • 3 international mail processing centres
  • 36 international offices
  • 51 inland offices

Regional Distribution of CBSA Offices

Regional Distribution of CBSA Offices

CBSA around the World

CBSA around the World

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context: conditions affecting our work

The CBSA operates in a complex and dynamic environment where it must respond to emerging global trends and threats all while protecting Canada’s people, economy and infrastructure. The Agency continues to transform the way it conducts its business by increasing the utilization of information technology and data analytics to fulfill its mandate and by better aligning its resources to deliver results to Canadians.

Terrorism on a global scale remains a significant concern to Canada and continues to have an impact on the safety and security of Canadians. In order to keep Canadians safe, the Agency must leverage new technologies and data analytics to identify and mitigate threats. Collaboration among the Public Safety Portfolio departments as well as with the international community to detect indirect threats abroad remains a key priority.

In 2017–18, Canada saw an influx in irregular migration, with increases in asylum seekers arriving at ports of entry and illegal crossings between land ports of entry. Illegal border crossings are not expected to decrease, particularly due to the uncertainty of various United States administration decisions on immigration policy. Canada remains alert as both regular and irregular immigration trends will continue to increase over the next three years. To support these increases, the Minister of Public Safety announced funding to transform and improve the immigration detention system in Canada.

The opioid crisis also continues to be an ongoing threat in Canada, with dangerous and sometimes lethal substances such as fentanyl entering the country through various means, putting Canadians at risk. In response to this growing crisis, Bill C-37, which amends the Customs Act, received Royal Assent in May 2017. It grants border officers in the postal mode authority to inspect incoming packages weighing less than 30 grams in order to prevent these harmful substances from entering Canada. While the opioid crisis remains a danger, the CBSA, like many other departments, is also preparing for the anticipated legalization of cannabis in July 2018. In the proposed Bill C-45, the Cannabis Act, the CBSA will receive federal funding to develop policy, ensure organized crime does not infiltrate the legalized system and keep cannabis from crossing our borders. Under the proposed Act, cannabis will remain illegal to import into Canada, or export from Canada.

Additionally, in conjunction with the new political direction of the United States, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is seeing some chapters being rewritten. As Canada continues to negotiate with its allies to the south, the Agency will need to anticipate new and amended trade compliance requirements.

Key risks: things that could affect our ability to achieve our plans and results

Key risks

Security: The risk of not keeping pace with cross-border criminal activity, national security threats, migration flows and public safety priorities.

The CBSA plays an important role in ensuring the safety and security of Canadians and protecting public health and the country's economic prosperity. Keeping pace with cross-border criminal activity, national security threats, migration flows and public safety priorities is an ongoing challenge. Technological advances present both threats and opportunities in border management. While these advances may increase the Agency's capabilities, they may also benefit transnational organized crime groups in identifying and exploiting border vulnerabilities. Ongoing work towards full implementation of the Entry/Exit Initiative, expansion of biometric screening and verification, as well as the Agency's core targeting, examination, detection, and enforcement activities serve to help mitigate this risk.

Intelligence and Analysis: The risk of not adequately analyzing global information, trends and challenges related to security and supply.

The Agency's ability to address border threats is related to the degree to which it can analyze global information, trends and challenges related to security and supply. As such, the availability of actionable intelligence is of great importance; however, current jurisdictional agreements and legislation impact intelligence flows between the Agency and its partners. A lack of international information-sharing agreements on a broader scope of topics also creates difficulties in addressing threats. Ongoing consultation with security screening partners, finalizing the implementation of the Interactive Advance Passenger Information (IAPI) initiative, and continued work towards strengthening data analytics capabilities are some of the efforts that are contributing to managing this risk.

Facilitation: The risk of not enhancing business models to increasingly facilitate the border movement of low-risk travellers and goods.

Businesses, as well as travellers, expect a quick and efficient border crossing experience. Greater use of automation offers more simplicity, transparency and speed in service delivery. Trusted programs, which enhance trade chain and traveller security while providing pre-approved, low-risk travellers and traders with streamlined and efficient border processes, continue to see strong growth. However, pressures related to program maintenance and compliance monitoring are being experienced, increasing the risk that program benefits may not be fully realized. Continued expansion of Primary Inspection Kiosk (PIK) technology at Canadian airports, ongoing analysis of options to expand the Preclearance program, and continued support of the Gordie Howe International Bridge project are examples of efforts that are helping to ensure this risk is managed.

Trade Compliance: The risk of not enforcing trade compliance and collecting appropriate revenue.

The Agency influences the Canadian marketplace by enforcing trade compliance and collecting revenue fairly, thereby ensuring a level playing field. The Agency has limited available capacity to target imports for trade compliance verification, which increases the likelihood of inaccurately assessed goods entering the country undetected. Revenue-focused trade compliance risking and verification activities and ongoing work towards the implementation of the CBSA Assessment Revenue Management initiative (CARM) are some of the controls for addressing this risk.

Risks Risk response strategy Link to the department’s Core Responsibilities Link to mandate letter commitments or to government‑wide and departmental priorities
Security
  • Work jointly with the U.S. on the Entry/Exit Initiative
  • Continue expansion of biometric screening and verification
  • Border Management
  • Border Enforcement
Government of Canada Priority:
  • Security and Opportunity
Intelligence and Analysis
  • Finalize implementation of IAPI program
  • Strengthen data analytics capabilities
  • Border Management
  • Border Enforcement
Government of Canada Priority:
  • Security and Opportunity
Facilitation
  • Continue expansion of PIK technology at Canadian airports
  • Analyze options to expand the Preclearance program
  • Border Management
Government of Canada Priority:
  • A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy
Trade Compliance
  • Focus trade compliance risking and verification activities on revenue generation potential
  • Continue implementation of the CARM initiative
  • Border Management
Government of Canada Priority:
  • A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy

Status Report on Transformational and Major Crown Projects

Project name: CBSA Assessment and Revenue Management (CARM)

Description

CARM is a multi-year initiative to modernize and optimize CBSA's commercial assessment and revenue collection processes and systems. When fully implemented, CARM will provide new and streamlined ways for commercial Trade Chain Partners to interact with the CBSA, and provide the CBSA with a modernized financial management regime focused on providing self-serve client-based services and processes.

CBSA collects over $30B in duties and taxes each year – making it the second largest revenue collector (behind Canada Revenue Agency) for the Government of Canada. Ensuring the accurate and efficient assessment, collection and reporting of this revenue from importers is key to ensuring the CBSA upholds its financial stewardship responsibilities. By simplifying the processes associated with the assessment and collection of duties and taxes for commercial clients, rules and regulation compliance will also improve for commercial clients. At the end of the day, doing business in Canada will be easier with the implementation of CARM.

The CARM project is included in the Treasury Board Secretariat's oversight portfolio of major IT-enabled projects.

Project outcomes

The transformation of the CBSA’s assessment and revenue management functions through CARM is intended to produce the following business outcomes:

Industrial benefits

The CARM project will benefit commercial clients and Canadian businesses by:

Sponsoring department

Canada Border Services Agency

Contracting authority

Public Services and Procurement Canada

Participating departments

Canada Revenue Agency
Shared Services Canada
Treasury Board Secretariat

Prime contractor

To be determined.

Major subcontractors

To be determined.

Project phase

CARM Phase 1 was completed with the implementation of the Accounts Receivable Ledger (ARL) in January 2016.

CARM Phase 2 Planning is in process. In November-2017, CARM Design Stage was approved by Treasury Board (TB). CARM will return to TB in Spring-2019 for TB approval to complete the remainder of CARM.

Major milestones

Progress report and explanation of variances

Project name: Electronic Manifest (eManifest)

Description

eManifest is a major transformative initiative and part of the overall measures the Government of Canada is putting in place to enhance the safety and security of Canadians as well as international trade while streamlining cross-border processes. When fully implemented, eManifest will require carriers, freight forwarders, and importers in all modes of transportation to electronically transmit advance commercial information (ACI) to the CBSA within prescribed mode-specific time frames.

Project Outcomes

Industrial benefits

Sponsoring department

Canada Border Services Agency

Contracting authority

Participating departments

Not Applicable

Prime contractor

Not Applicable

Major subcontractors

IBM, Emerion

Project phase

Closing Phase

Major milestones

The eManifest planned milestones include the completion of 6 deployments:

Accomplished:

Progress report and explanation of variances

Treasury Board approved eManifest project authority of $415 million.

Under the direction of the Financial Investment Management Committee (FIMC) and Executive Committee (EC), the eManifest Project has initiated formal project closeout and transition activities as of September 30, 2017, which is the end date of the TB authorities granted to the CBSA in the 2015 TB Submission. The project will be seeking approval for the Project Management Framework Gate 6 from the Transformation, Innovation and Project Portfolio (TIPP) committee in February 2018, with Gate 7 approval following in March 2018.

Gender-based analysis plus

Governance structures

CBSA has endorsed the following policy statement:

The CBSA will make GBA+ an integral part of our policies, programs, and initiatives to ensure an understanding of the impacts on gender and diversity, in order to make better decisions and achieve better results for all our clients, stakeholders and all Canadians.

To fulfill this policy, the Agency is presently using a distributed model of GBA+ responsibilities across the Agency incorporating the following roles:

The CBSA GBA+ Champion and Responsibility Centre work closely with initiative leads and the offices responsible for reviewing submissions to central agencies to help enhance the analysis done when the Agency is completing mandatory GBA+ reviews.

During fiscal year 2018/19, the Agency will continue to advance efforts to remove implementation barriers and build institutional capacity through a variety of initiatives including:

Enhancing communication and understanding of the advantages of GBA+ so it continues to become engrained as a regular business process used across the Agency.

Human resources

There are a total of six employees that directly act as or support the work of the Champion and the Responsibility Centre and numerous others on advisory committees or other governance bodies. However, there are no employees specifically dedicated solely to GBA+, making it very difficult to provide an accurate FTE count.

Planned initiatives

Core Responsibility: Border Management
Primary Inspection Kiosks

Expanding on PIK 1.0, PIK 2.0 in 2018–19 will continue those GBA+ elements that were successfully deployed including the ability to evaluate against each of the GBA+ identity factors, such as age, mobility, gender, and socio-economic considerations.

In 2018-19, the CBSA will introduce additional functionality, including systematic fingerprint verification of biometrically-enrolled travellers, to the next generation of Primary Inspection Kiosks (PIK), at eight major airports across Canada.

These enhanced kiosks will use different match thresholds for males and females. Any scores below threshold will cause the traveller to be referred for visual inspection. This mitigation will be applied to ALL matches not meeting the threshold, regardless of gender, race, or age.

The design and implementation of PIK uses Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) to ensure that the deployment of this technology does not unfairly disadvantage any one group.

Core Responsibility: Border Enforcement
CBSA National Detention Standards: Special Measures – Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Transgender and Intersex Individuals (LGBTI)

In continued support of our Agency’s commitment to GBA+ the National Detention Standards have been written to ensure that guidance is provided on the treatment of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans/transgender and intersex detainees.

These standards make clear, that all detainees will be treated with dignity, respect and fairness regardless of their sexual orientation and that decisions about LGBTI individuals’ needs should be in consultation with the Agency. These detention standards state that LGBTI individual and all interactions between the CBSA and LGBTI detainees should be carried out with proper regard to the sensitivity and vulnerability of the detainee concerned and every reasonable effort should be made to secure their cooperation as to minimize discomfiture.

Internal Services
Recruitment

In late 2018, the CBSA will be applying a GBA+ lens to the new Border Services Officer recruitment process that was launched in Summer 2017. The Agency will look to the findings of the RCMP’s GBA+ study on recruitment for best practices.

Additionally, targeted recruitment events for Women will continue with our Security & Intelligence partners with a special focus being placed on how branding is perceived from a GBA+ perspective. The Agency will also look into a completing a deep-dive diagnostic on GBA+ as a result of the recent decline of women in BSO recruitment and the lack of women being promoted to EX ranks.

Training

Through the implementation of a design checklist that includes GBA+ considerations, the CBSA will ensure that GBA+ is incorporated within the instructional design and development of courseware and that our training products are responsive and representative of the diversity of learners and clients.

Further, the CBSA Basic Instructional Techniques course (mandatory for training delivery) will be redesigned to include classroom inclusivity strategies and GBA+ considerations. This will help in equipping instructors with tools on how to incorporate gender, diversity and inclusiveness considerations into the facilitation of training.

Mental Health

While there are no planned new initiatives directly related to GBA+, the purpose of CBSA’s Mental Health Strategy is to create a culture that enshrines psychological health, safety and well-being in all aspects of the workplace through collaboration, inclusivity and respect.  It is an all-inclusive strategy designed to engage and benefit all employees, regardless of gender. 

The strategy makes clear that CBSA is committed to taking proper action towards instances of incivility, harassment and discrimination by strengthening its commitment to create and maintain an inclusive, healthy and respectful workplace. Specifically, CBSA has made mandatory for all employees, two online courses on Mental Health, which touch on the importance of inclusivity and respect in the workplace. Additionally, a checklist has been developed and implemented to ensure a mental health lens is applied to the development and review of CBSA policies. The checklist forces policy makers to consider psychological factors that impact mental health, such as diversity and inclusivity.  These ongoing initiatives will support closing key gaps between diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people.

Diversity

In 2018, the national program for Young Women in Public Safety (YWPS), an event held with the Public Safety Portfolio partners to increase awareness for young women to consider careers in security and intelligence fields, will be expanded to also engage youth on the perceived stigmas for women in the Security & Intelligence (S&I) community.

The CBSA will also be partnering with the Trent University Dean of Social Sciences/Women’s Studies to find ways to promote careers in S&I in post-secondary in institutions with a GBA+ focus.  Opportunities will also be explored to create a focused study group for students in the Women’s Studies Program to examine issues around women in enforcement fields. The CBSA is currently participating in work with the S&I community facilitated by Status of Women Canada on applying a GBA+ lens regarding the Uniform Task Force.

Performance Measurement

While formal plans for monitoring performance have not yet been established, the Agency will look into identifying performance measures and related indicators for each of the above mentioned initiatives in 2018–19.

Planned evaluation coverage over the next five fiscal years

Program Last evaluation Evaluations planned in the next 5 years Fiscal year of approval 2018–19 Program spending covered by the planned evaluation (dollars) 2018–19 Program spending covered by all planned evaluations (dollars) 2018–19 Total program spending (dollars) Rationale for not evaluating Program or spending
Targeting Centralized Targeting 2016 Interactive Advance Passenger Information 2018–19 N/A N/A N/A The program is not a one-to-one match with a program or sub-program in the Departmental Results Framework (DRF).
Targeting 2021–22 To be determined To be determined $26.07M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Intelligence Collection and Analysis Intelligence Program 2014 3I Integration (Intelligence Collection and Analysis, Criminal Investigations, Immigration Enforcement) 2018-19 To be determined To be determined $53.07M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Admissibility Screening and Supporting Intelligence Activities 2009
Security Screening   Security Screening 2020–21 To be determined To be determined $7.13M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Traveller Facilitation and Compliance Traveller Processing (Marine) 2017
Traveller Processing (Highway and Rail) 2014
Traveller Processing (Air) 2014
Traveller Facilitation and Compliance 2019–20 To be determined To be determined $415.71M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Entry/Exit and Radio Frequency Identification Technology (RFID) 2021–22 N/A N/A N/A The program is not a one-to-one match with a program or sub-program in the Departmental Results Framework (DRF).
Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance Commercial Processing (Air) 2018
Trade Incentives, Licensing and Registration programs
2015 Commercial
Revenue and Trade Management (Trade Compliance) 2014
Clearance of Commercial Passenger Vessels 2012
Examination Processes and Detection Technology 2009
Single Window Initiative (Horizontal Evaluation - lead) 2020-2021 N/A N/A N/A The program is not a one-to-one match with a program or sub-program in the Departmental Results Framework (DRF).  
eManifest 2020–21 N/A N/A N/A The program is not a one-to-one match with a program or sub-program in the Departmental Results Framework (DRF).
Trade Facilitation and Compliance 2020–21 To be determined To be determined $245.20M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Commercial Facilitation and Compliance 2020–21 To be determined To be determined $245.20M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Postal Modernization Initiative 2022–23 N/A N/A N/A The program is not a one-to-one match with a program or sub-program in the Departmental Results Framework (DRF).  
Trusted Traveller Evaluation of the Trusted Traveller Programs (Air, Land, Marine) 2017 None N/A N/A N/A $22.79M Evaluation not added due to recent coverage and percentage of organizational spending.
Trusted Trader Trusted Traders
2015
Trusted Trader 2021–22 To be determined To be determined $8.06M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Anti-Dumping and Countervailing Evaluation of the CBSA Anti-dumping and Countervailing Program 2017 None N/A N/A N/A $3.93M Evaluation not added due to recent coverage and percentage of organizational spending.
Recourse Evaluation of the Recourse Program 2018
Evaluation of the Recourse Program 2013
N/A N/A To be determined To be determined $9.06M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Force Generation Evaluation of Arming 2017
CBSA's Enforcement Teams
2012
CBSA's Participation in Joint Force Operations
2012
Evaluation of Arming 2010
Force Generation 2018–19 To be determined To be determined $42.21M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Buildings and Equipment N/A Infrastructure and Materiel 2021–22 To be determined To be determined $59.69M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Field Technology Support N/A Science and Engineering 2019–20 To be determined To be determined $16.50M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Detection Technology 2021–22 N/A N/A N/A The program is not a one-to-one match with a program or sub-program in the Departmental Results Framework (DRF).  
Immigration Investigations Immigration Investigations
2016
3I Integration (Intelligence Collection and Analysis, Criminal Investigations, Immigration Enforcement) 2018-19 To be determined To be determined $34.06 The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Detentions Detentions and Removals Program
2010
3I Integration (Intelligence Collection and Analysis, Criminal Investigations, Immigration Enforcement) 2018-19 To be determined To be determined $50.98M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Hearings N/A Hearings 2018–19 To be determined To be determined $21.39M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Removals Detentions and Removals Program
2010
Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration Pilot 2015
3I Integration (Intelligence Collection and Analysis, Criminal Investigations, Immigration Enforcement) 2018-19 To be determined To be determined $28.71M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Criminal Investigations Criminal Investigations Program
2016
3I Integration (Intelligence Collection and Analysis, Criminal Investigations, Immigration Enforcement) 2018-19 To be determined To be determined $27.93M The coverage of program spending cannot be determined until the evaluation is scoped in the planning phase of the project.
Internal Services N/A Performance Management 2021–22 N/A N/A N/A The program is not a one-to-one match with a program or sub-program in the Departmental Results Framework (DRF).
Total         To be determined $1072.49M  
Note: all references to program spending refer to planned spending for the 2018–19 fiscal year only and not cumulative spending over 5 years.

Upcoming internal audits for the coming fiscal year

Title of internal audit Area being audited Status Expected completion date

eManifest

Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance

In progress

June 2018

Advance Commercial Information System Data Quality/Integrity - Air

Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance

In progress

December 2018

Border Controls for Marine Ports of Entry (Follow-up)

Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance

In progress

March 2019

Revenue Collection at the Border (ARL and Cash Management)

Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance

In progress

March 2019

Management of Information Technology Security - Phase 3

Information Management / Information Technology

In progress

2019-20

Occupational Health and Safety

People Management

In progress

2019-20

Integrated Planning, Budgeting and Reporting

Management of Integrated Risk, Planning and Performance

Planned

2019-20

B2 Refunds (Follow-up)

Commercial-Trade Facilitation and Compliance

Planned

2019-20

Lookouts (Follow-up)

Intelligence Collection and Analysis

Planned

2019-20

Enterprise Architecture

Information Management / Information Technology

Planned

2019-20

International Liaison Network

Intelligence Collection and Analysis

Planned

2019-20

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy Canada Border Services Agency

FSDS goal FSDS contributing actions Original text of corresponding departmental action New or updated text of corresponding departmental action Comments

Correction

 

The 2016-2020 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy…

The 2016-2019 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy…

Page 2 text and Section 2 header

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The CBSA reduces departmental gas emissions thereby improving energy efficiency of buildings and fleet.

The CBSA reduces departmental greenhouse gas emissions thereby improving energy efficiency of buildings and fleet.

Page 5 – Expected Results

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Reduce Green House Gas (GHG) emissions…

Reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions…

Page 3 – FSDS Targets

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Our Ports of Entry and office buildings are the largest source…

Our Ports of Entry are the largest source…

Page 3 – Key Priorities

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Italicized text

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Throughout document  - To align with Canada.ca Content Style Guide

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pan-Canadian framework on clean growth and climate change

Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change

Page 4 – Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings

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Internal Services

Buildings and Equipment

Page 5, 6 – Link to Program Inventory
New program under the Departmental Results Framework

FSDS Goal 2: Low-Carbon Government

Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings

The CBSA has set an 11% emissions reduction target by 2020 (1.1% reduction per year).

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Page 4 – Not relevant

FSDS Goal 2: Low-Carbon Government

Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings

The CBSA Greenhouse gas emissions reduction of 1.1% per year from buildings and fleet relative to fiscal year 2015-2016, expressed as a percentage

Percentage (%) change in GHG emissions, from facilities and fleet, from fiscal year 2005-06

Page 4 – Performance Indicators

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