Air Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements

Memorandum D3-2-1

ISSN 2369-2391

Ottawa, August 5, 2015

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In Brief

This memorandum has been revised to:

  • (a) Include pre-arrival, arrival, and post arrival eManifest processes, cancelling Memorandum D12-2-1.
  • (b) Include in-transit processes, cancelling Memorandum D3-2-2.
  • (c) Remove references to the Post Audit program, which ended .
  • (d) Denote the Agency, Division and Branch names current appellations.

This memorandum outlines the Canada Border Services Agency’s (CBSA) procedures for the advance notification, reporting, use and control of aircrafts in international commercial services.

This memorandum does not outline the policies and procedures for the, reporting of goods under the Customs Self-Assessment (CSA) Program; consolidated cargo reporting requirements and process for freight forwarders; goods whether commercial or personal transported by an individual who does not meet the criteria for designation as a carrier or goods being exported from Canada, or Other Government Departments (OGD) requirements pertaining to the commercial importation/in-transit movements of regulated goods. For information on the Customs Self-Assessment (CSA) Program policies, guidelines and procedures, refer to Memorandum D3-1-7, Customs SelfAssessment Program for Carriers. For information about freight forwarder transmitting and reporting processes refer to Memorandum D3-3-1, Forwarded and Consolidated Cargo – Import Movements. For information about the reporting and transportation of goods being exported from Canada, refer to Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements. For information on the release of commercial goods, please refer to Memorandum D17-1-4, Release of Commercial Goods. OGD requirements can be found throughout the D Memoranda series.

Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) procedures pertaining to the non-commercial operations of private and corporate aircraft are explained in Memorandum D2-1-1, Temporary Importation of Baggage and Conveyances by Non-residents.

For reporting requirements for passengers and crew on board commercial aircraft, please see Memoranda D2-5-6, Aircrew Reporting and D2-5-11, Administrative and Operational Guidelines for Commercial Air-mode Carriers for the Processing of Prescribed Traveller Information Pursuant to the Requirements of the Canada Border Services Agency.


Table of Contents

Guidelines and General Information

Definitions

1. The following definitions apply to this memorandum:

ACI
Advance Commercial Information
AMPS
Administrative Monetary Penalty System
AOE - Airport of Entry
designations indicate airports that have been authorized by the CBSA for the arrival and departure of international flights. The AOE designation refers only to CBSA’s reporting requirements and does not apply to the airport’s physical facilities or operational capabilities.
AOE/#
Airport of entry for the clearance of scheduled and unscheduled air traffic but with passenger restrictions as indicated by an appropriate numerical designator (e.g. AOE/100).
CACM
Conveyance Arrival Certification Message
Commercial goods
Goods that are or will be imported for sale or for any commercial, industrial, occupational, institutional or other similar use.
Cargo
A term used to describe a collection of goods or shipment. It consists of a grouping of related goods. The cargo is detailed on the waybill, the manifest or a Cargo Control Document.
Cargo Control Document (CCD)
A manifest or other control document that acts as the record of a shipment entering or exiting Canada e.g. air waybill, A8A(B).
Cargo Control Number (CCN)
The Cargo Control Number is a number assigned to a transport document. It uniquely identifies cargo detailed on a cargo submission. The Cargo Control Number consists of the Carrier code followed by a unique reference number assigned by the Carrier/Representative and cannot contain spaces.
  • 1st 4 characters = CBSA approved carrier code
Cargo transmission
A cargo transmission is the package of cargo data that is transmitted. It is comprised of a Cargo Control Number (CCN) for each shipment on the conveyance along with the corresponding cargo data, and the Conveyance Reference Number (CRN) corresponding to the conveyance the cargo is being transported on.
Carrier
For the purpose of assessing carrier code eligibility, the CBSA defines a carrier as the entity operating a conveyance transporting specified goods to Canada. To operate a conveyance means to have legal custody and control of the conveyance as:
  • (a an owner;
  • (b) a lessee under a lease or agreement of hire;
  • (c) a charterer under an agreement of hire;
  • (d) as a purchaser under a conditional sale or hire purchase agreement that reserves to the vendor the title to the conveyance until the purchase price is paid or certain conditions are performed; or
  • (e) a mortgagor.
Carrier code
As stated in the Customs Act, means the unique identification number issued by the Minister either under subsection 12.1(4) or before the coming into force of that subsection.
Client
Anyone who:
  • (a) Sends to the CBSA a collection of information; or
  • (b) Receives notices from the CBSA
Consignee
The definition of consignee is to be understood as follow given the applicable context:
  • (a) The consignee definition to be used by carriers when transmitting electronic pre-arrival data: The name and address of the party to which the cargo/goods are being shipped to as shown on carrier’s contract of carriage (for example: bill of lading, air waybill or other shipping document).
  • (b) The consignee definition used with respect to freight forwarders who are providing the CBSA with detailed information pertaining to a consolidated shipment is: The name and address of the party to which the cargo/goods are being “shipped to” as shown on carrier’s contract of carriage (for example: bill of lading, air waybill, or other shipping document).
  • (c) The consignee definition used with respect to freight forwarders who are providing the CBSA with detailed information pertaining to a deconsolidated shipment will be: The name and address of the party to which the goods are being “shipped to” as shown on the commercial sales contract (for example: commercial invoice, bill of sale, or other sales contract.
  • Note: The freight forwarder is limited to the information they have on hand at the time of the transmission. The consignee may change more than one time throughout a voyage to Canada. The freight forwarder will provide updates to the transmission as they receive updated information
  • Example: For business or legal reasons goods are consigned to a bank (foreign or Canadian domestic) or “to order” of a bank. In this case, the consignee field of the house bill transmitted by the FF will reflect the party to whom the goods are legally consigned at the time of transmission (the bank). If the goods are sold while en route, and/or if the bank chooses to endorse the goods to a third party (as per the “to order”) or if the consignee information otherwise changes; the FF will submit an electronic update to the house bill data as soon as they become aware of the change, updating the consignee field.
Consolidation
A number of separate shipments grouped together by a consolidator or freight forwarder and shipped to an agent or a freight forwarder as one shipment under one bill of lading and reported to CBSA on one cargo control document.
Conveyance
Taken from Customs Act s.2(1). Any vehicle, aircraft or water-borne craft or any other contrivance that is used to move persons or goods.
Conveyance operating carrier
The carrier company operating the conveyance transporting goods to Canada. This is true whether the carrier company owns the conveyance outright, leases the conveyance, or whether any type of security interest is registered on the conveyance.
Conveyance Reference Number (CRN)
A unique reference number given by the carrier to a certain journey or departure of a means of transport.
Courier LVS
LVS goods being imported under the courier LVS program by an approved courier. Courier LVS goods are exempt from the eManifest process.
CSA
Customs Self-Assessment
Deconsolidation
That process whereby a consolidated shipment is divided into individual shipments consigned to various consignees.
Diversion
the rerouting of a shipment, before arrival at the destination CBSA office or sufferance warehouse or break-bulk facility indicated on the cargo transmission or control document, to a different CBSA destination point.
ECCRD
Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document
EDI - Electronic Data Interchange
Systems allow clients to electronically transmit their import or export data, as well as their accounting documents, to the CBSA. These systems facilitate the CBSA’s ability to quickly process low-risk goods, focusing resources on identifying potential threats to Canada’s safety and security. EDI is a set of standards for structuring information to be electronically exchanged between and within businesses, organizations, government entities and other groups. These standards prescribe the formats, character sets, and data elements used in the exchange of business documents and forms. The term EDI is also used to refer to the implementation and operation of systems and processes for creating, transmitting, and receiving EDI documents.
Flying trucks
Air cargo that arrives in Canada on a highway conveyance.
First Port of Arrival (FPOA)
The first Canadian airport at which the aircraft lands for any reason including but not limited to the loading and/or discharging of cargo, safety inspections, crew changes, diversions, etc.
Freight forwarder
A person who, on behalf of one or more owners, importers, shippers or consignees of goods, causes specified goods to be transported by one or more carriers.
Freight Remaining on Board (FROB)
Cargo that is not being discharged at a Canadian airport but remains on board the aircraft for furtherance to its ultimate destination outside of Canada.
Hand-carried goods
Goods that will be released after they have been accounted for and all duties with respect to them have been paid under subsection 32(1) of the Act if
  • (a) the goods are or will be in the actual possession of a person arriving in Canada; or
  • (b) the goods form or will form part of a person’s baggage and the person and the baggage arrive or will arrive in Canada on board the same conveyance.
HVS
High Value Shipment
In-transit (air)
The movement of conveyance/goods through Canada to another country without disposing of goods or people. This includes trans-shipment of goods arriving by air in Canada and transferring to another aircraft departing Canada.
Low Value Shipment (LVS)
Commercial goods with a value for duty not exceeding CAD $2,500. LVS goods are not exempt from the eManifest process. See “Courier LVS” definition is this section.
OGD
Other Government Departments. Federal Departments or Agencies such as: Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) or Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development (DFATD) etc.
PARS - Pre-Arrival Review System
A line release option allowing importers and brokers to present release documents prior to the arrival of a shipment in order to obtain release upon arrival.
Port of report
The port where air cargo physically crosses into Canada at the FPOA. The carrier may use any automated port of report. The port of arrival of all cargo on board a conveyance should match the port of report.
Pre-arrival
Prior to a conveyance or cargo arriving in Canada.
Pre-arrival information
Data pertaining to the importation of goods that is sent to CBSA in advance of the actual arrival.
Re-manifest
is a new cargo control document, with a new cargo control number, that is presented to change a cargo control document that had previously been submitted to the CBSA. Re-manifests are generally presented to change destination office or carrier code.
Record
Any material on which data are recorded or marked and which is capable of being read or understood by a person or a computer system or other device.
Release Notification System (RNS)
A system message sent to the client regarding the status of cargo.
Shipment
  • (a) A shipment for which a carrier is responsible is one that consists of:
    • (i) a specified good or collection of specified goods that is listed in a single bill of lading, waybill or other similar document that is issued by the carrier and that relates to the carriage of those goods; or
    • (ii) a specified good that is an empty cargo container that is not for sale that is transported by the carrier but that is not listed in a bill of lading, waybill or other similar document; and
  • (b) a shipment for which a freight forwarder is responsible is one that consists of a specified good or collection of specified goods that is listed in a single bill of lading, waybill or other similar document that is issued by the freight forwarder and that relates to the carriage of those goods.
Split-shipment
Portions of one shipment covered by one air waybill enter the country at different times
Specified goods
(under the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations) – commercial goods, goods that are or will be imported to Canada for a fee and empty cargo containers that are not for sale but does not include:
  • (a) goods that will be released after they have been accounted for and all duties with respect to them have been paid under subsection 32(1) of the Act if
    • (i) the goods are or will be in the actual possession of a person arriving in Canada, or
    • (ii) the goods form or will form part of a person’s baggage and the person and the baggage arrive or will arrive in Canada on board the same conveyance;
  • (b) mail;
  • (c) commercial goods that are used in a repair that is made outside Canada to a conveyance that was built in Canada or in respect of which duties have been paid, if the repair is made as a result of an unforeseen contingency that occurs outside Canada and is necessary to ensure the conveyance’s safe return to Canada;
  • (d) a military conveyance within the meaning of subsection 18(1) of the Canadian Transportation Accident Investigation and Safety Board Act or goods that are transported on board that conveyance;
  • (e) an emergency conveyance or goods that are transported on board that conveyance; or
  • (f) a conveyance that returns to Canada immediately after being denied entry to the United States or goods that are transported on board that conveyance.
Supplementary Cargo Report (SCR)
A set of data elements transmitted by a carrier or freight forwarder client to complete a cargo report. It is used to complete an electronic Advance Commercial Information (ACI) cargo report in Air and Marine modes. Data elements include detailed cargo information that is not available on the original cargo report (i.e. ultimate consignee, precise description, and shipper information).
Supplementary Reference Number (SRN)
Reference number assigned by the freight forwarder or carrier or the carrier’s agent to identify the Supplementary Cargo Report.

General Information

2. The Customs Act, the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations and the Transportation of Goods Regulations, establish the time, manner and who is required to send pre-arrival data pertaining to commercial cargo [for import, in-transit, and freight remaining on board (FROB)] and conveyances entering or moving in-transit through Canada. To obtain a copy of the regulations, please see the Department of Justice’s Web site.

3. The receipt of pre-arrival cargo and conveyance data enables the CBSA to:
(a) More effectively manage higher risk goods and identify threats to health, safety, and security prior to the arrival of cargo and conveyances in Canada;
(b) Allow lower risk goods a more efficient, stream-lined process at the border; and,
(c) Control the movement of in bond goods.

4. Except as otherwise prescribed in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations and the Transportation of Goods Regulations all goods that are imported, moving in-transit through Canada or FROB must be reported to the CBSA at the first port of arrival (FPOA) in Canada, even when exempt from the requirement to provide Advance Commercial Information (ACI). The requirement to report goods to the CBSA is effected electronically, orally or in writing, in the prescribed manner as described in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

5. International commercial transportation means any transportation resulting in, or intended to result in, the carriage of persons or goods for hire or reward, or any transportation of persons or goods by or on behalf of an enterprise engaged in an activity of financial return, where the persons or goods are conveyed:
(a) from outside Canada to a place inside Canada;
(b) from a place inside Canada to a place outside Canada; or
(c) from a place outside Canada in transit through Canada to another place outside Canada.

In General – Air Cargo Reporting Requirement

6. All information on air cargo shipments (including Company owned materials (COMAT goods) entering or transiting (including Freight remaining on board (FROB) shipments) Canada must be provided electronically in accordance with the ACI notification guidelines, procedures and timeframes outlined in this memorandum.

Enter at Authorized Airport of Entry

7. All air cargo being imported into Canada must enter the country via an authorized Airport of Entry (AOE) that has commercial services suitable for handling the cargo. In addition, in bond goods may only be transported between airports that provide commercial services for the handling and/or clearance of the in bond goods.

Air Cargo at Airports Without Commercial Services

8. Goods may be manifested to an airport that does not normally handle commercial shipments provided the delivering carrier has made arrangements, approved by the chief officer of the CBSA office involved, to have the cargo delivered into an established sufferance warehouse for CBSA clearance.

9. Commercial service is not given at airports that do not normally handle commercial goods unless, due to an emergency situation, there is a request to clear urgently needed goods. The requirements of the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) must be adhered to and special service or cost recovery charges assessed. Airports that provide commercial services are identified in the directory of CBSA offices. Information on special service fees can be found in Memorandum D1-2-1, Special Services.

Liability

10. All carriers transporting specified goods into Canada must electronically transmit to the CBSA specified data pertaining to the cargo and conveyance within the prescribed timeframes as described in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. Provision of this data and within prescribed timeframes satisfies the requirement set out in Section 12.1 of the Customs Act.

11. Transmission of electronic pre-arrival conveyance/cargo data does not constitute “reporting” for the purposes of Section 12(1) of the Customs Act. Report, as defined in Section 12(1) is not achieved until the conveyance has arrived in Canada and a report is made to the CBSA at the FPOA by way of the Conveyance Arrival Certification Message (CACM).

12. As per Section 7.1 of the Customs Act, carriers are liable to ensure all information provided to the CBSA, including pre-arrival and at arrival information, is true, accurate, and complete. Furthermore, as per Section 22 of the Customs Act and Section 7 of the Transportation of Goods Regulations, the information transmitted must be supported by source documentation (i.e. bills of lading, invoices, contract of carriage) and made available to the CBSA upon request.

13. As per the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations,the operator of a conveyance that transports specified goods to Canada is solely liable for providing all primary cargo and conveyance pre-arrival and at arrival information by electronic means, in accordance with the technical requirements, specifications and procedures that are set out in Chapter 2: Advance Commercial Information (ACI) Air Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document (ECCRD).

14. The operator of a conveyance (hereafter known as the “conveyance operating carrier”) is ultimately responsible for the conveyance and the primary cargo on board. It is their carrier code that must be quoted within the conveyance report when transmitting conveyance data to the CBSA. Where business arrangements exist, another carrier may provide the pre-arrival data to the CBSA; however, it is the conveyance operating carrier that remains liable for pre-arrival primary cargo and conveyance and at arrival information requirements in accordance with Section 12 of the Customs Act.

15. The carrier whose carrier code is on the cargo transmission is liable for duties and taxes for the goods until released by the CBSA, or until liability is transferred in accordance with Section 20(2) of the Customs Act.

16. Carriers may hire a service provider or agent to transmit advance cargo and/or conveyance and at arrival information on their behalf. The carrier code on the electronic transmission must be that of the actual carrier, not the agent or service provider. In order for the CBSA to communicate with the agent or service provider on behalf of the carrier, a third party consent must be completed and on file with the Agency.

Record Keeping

17. In addition to records required to be maintained for other program areas, every person who transports or causes goods to be transported into or within Canada is required, under the Transportation of Goods Regulations, to keep records of the electronic data that has been transmitted to the CBSA and any acknowledgment of receipt of that data received from the CBSA. Furthermore, the records that must be kept include all source documents specifically related to the individual data elements transmitted and information reported at time of arrival.

18. For CBSA purposes, records related to the conveyance, cargo transmission and report upon arrival must be kept for a period of three years. The retention period commences on the 1st day of January of the calendar year following the calendar year during which the cargo/conveyance referenced in the records were transported.

Monitoring

19. In addition to all other monitoring and verification activities, the CBSA will perform periodic monitoring of the records kept by carriers related to electronic conveyance and cargo information. The monitoring will confirm whether the conveyance and cargo data was submitted in a timely manner and that information transmitted pre- arrival is true, accurate and complete and corresponds to the information contained on the source documents on file.

Carrier Identification Requirement

20. Any carrier transporting or causing specified goods to be transported into Canada must have a CBSA assigned carrier code. A CBSA assigned carrier code, in the air mode is a three character alpha and/or numeric code followed by a hyphen.

21. The CBSA carrier code forms the prefix of the Cargo Control Number (CCN).

22. For the purpose of identifying carriers, a bonded or non-bonded CBSA carrier code will be assigned to a company upon authorization. This carrier code number must be shown on all cargo control documents presented or transmitted to the CBSA.

23. For information pertaining to carrier code requirements and how to obtain a carrier code, please refer to Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods.

Security Requirements

24. A carrier desiring to become bonded under general authorization must complete an application and file security in a format as outlined in CBSA forms. To become a bonded carrier security must be filed in accordance with Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods.

25. The amount of security required for a commercial air carrier to become bonded is based on the size and configuration of that carrier’s aircraft(s) according to the aircraft groupings specified in the Canadian Transportation Agency’s (CTA) Air Transportation Regulations.

26. The amount of security required for Canadian all-cargo aircraft is based on the maximum certificated take-off weight (MCTOW) of the aircraft. Security for Canadian passenger aircraft, including passenger/cargo combine configurations, is based on the CTA’s aircraft grouping determined by the certificated maximum number of passengers for that aircraft. You will find specific details on aircraft grouping in Appendix D of this memorandum.

27. To determine the amount of security required for non- Canadian aircraft, use the same criteria as that used for Canadian aircraft.

Note: CTA groupings only apply to Canadian carriers.

Transmission Timeframes

28. Carriers (or an authorized third-party provider acting on the carrier’s behalf), are required to prepare and transmit the required cargo, and conveyance information within the timeframes specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

29. In the air mode, the conveyance and cargo information for specified goods must be received, as outlined in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations, at least four hours prior to the aircraft’s arrival at the FPOA airport in Canada or, if the duration of the flight is less than four hours, before the aircraft’s time of departure.

30. A Conveyance Arrival Certification Message (CACM) must also be received after the aircraft is cleared by NAVCAN to land at an airport of arrival, as defined in the regulations, following arrival in Canada. The CACM must be transmitted in addition to information and requirements listed in paragraph 29 above.

31. For exemptions from cargo and conveyance requirements refer to paragraph 134 of this document.

32. Cargo and conveyance data may be transmitted up to 30 days in advance. The CBSA encourages clients to transmit pre-arrival data as early as possible.

Cargo Control Number and Conveyance Reference Number Reuse Timeframes

33. CCNs and CRNs for the following pre-arrival reports can be reused after one year:
(a) Air primary cargo reports;
(b) Air split-shipment reports;
(c) Air conveyance reports.

34. CCNs (or transportation document numbers) or CRNs used for Customs Self-Assessment (CSA) purposes in all modes will continue to be subject to the CBSA’s requirement that they remain unique and cannot be reused for 3-years starting of the year following its initial use. Cargo control numbers utilized by CSA air carriers will be available for reuse after one year. However, CSA carriers must ensure that their CSA control number is kept unique for three years. Therefore, the CCN must not be the CSA control number. Should CSA air carriers’ internal control procedures require modification to meet this requirement, CSA air carriers should contact their CSA senior program officer. For additional information on the CSA program, see Memorandum D3-1-7, Customs Self Assessment Program for Carriers.

35. A CCN or CRN that is attached to a transaction number that has an outstanding related request associated to it should not be reused until all CBSA processing related to the transaction is completed.

Electronic Communications With the CBSA

36. Carriers must transmit data using the CBSA’s electronic data interchange (EDI) systems. Before initiating the application process (outlined below), carriers must have a valid CBSA assigned carrier code, as per Section 12.1 of the Customs Act.

Application to Transmit Electronic Data to the CBSA

37. Carriers using EDI are required to complete an application form and submit it to the Technical Commercial Client Unit.

38. EDI clients may choose to transmit their own data to the CBSA or they may choose to use a service provider. For more information on how to apply to participate in EDI, methods of electronic communication and general information on EDI go to the EDI Systems Web page.

39. For all enquiries related to any problems with electronic transmission of data and the related application process, or to obtain a copy of Chapter 2: ACI Air ECCRD, contact the Technical Commercial Client Unit (TCCU) at:

Technical Commercial Client Unit
Canada Border Services Agency
355 North River Road, 6th floor, Tower B
Ottawa ON  K1A 0L8

Email: tccu-ustcc@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca
Phone: 1-888-957-7224 (Option 1) calls within Canada and the U.S. and 1-613-946-0762 for overseas callers

Transmitting Accurate Data

40. When using pre-arrival Review System (PARS), the electronically transmitted CCN on the cargo data must exactly match the CCN quoted in the PARS release request, inclusive of the acronym “PARS”, where applicable.

41. It is not a requirement to embed the letters “PARS” into a PARS number, but if a carrier does embed letters into the PARS number, then the carrier must use the identical number in their pre-arrival cargo transmission.

42. If the CCN quoted in the PARS release does not exactly match the electronically transmitted cargo data, this will affect the Release Notification System (RNS) capabilities and subscribers will not receive RNS messages. Inaccurate CCN transmissions by carriers could result in sanctions for non-compliance including the issuing of Administrative Monetary Penalty System(AMPS). Release may also be negatively affected.

Data Transmission Guidelines

Cargo Data

43. Commercial carriers should note that providing pre-arrival data does not replace the requirement to provide Advance Passenger Information/Passenger Name Record (API/PNR) data.

Primary Cargo Data

44. The primary cargo data must be electronically transmitted to the CBSA by the carrier or a service provider authorized by that carrier to transmit on their behalf, within the prescribed timeframes as specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. An air cargo transmission is mandatory for all non-exempt import, in-transit, and FROB cargo.

45. There are some exceptions to this requirement. These are listed in paragraph 136 of this memorandum.

46. A complete list of the information that an air carrier must include in the primary cargo transmission can be found in Chapter 2: ACI Air ECCRD.

Supplementary Cargo and House Bill Data

47. The supplementary data must be electronically transmitted to the CBSA by the freight forwarder or their authorized service provider, within the prescribed timeframes as specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. The supplementary cargo transmission is mandatory for all non-exempt FROB cargo.

48. The house bill data must be electronically transmitted to the CBSA by the freight forwarder or their authorized service provider, within the prescribed timeframes as specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. The house bill transmission is mandatory for all non-exempt import, in bond, and in-transit shipments.

Split Shipment Cargo Data

49. The split shipment data must be transmitted to the CBSA by the conveyance operating carrier or a service provider authorized by that carrier to transmit on their behalf, within the prescribed timeframes as specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

50. The split shipment process was designed to accommodate goods that were manifested as one shipment and then split prior to departure due to carrier capacity constraints. The transmission of a split shipment may only occur when the following conditions are met:
(a) must be consigned to the same party;
(b) must have been loaded in the same place of loading;
(c) must be destined to the same place of destination;
(d) must be same shipper.

51. The carrier will use the primary cargo data to transmit information on the master load electronically, noting the manifested quantity, and will then submit each portion of the split using the split shipment process, noting the conveyance and boarded quantity as well as referencing the original primary cargo control number. The sum of the boarded quantity of all the splits must equal the manifested quantity of the primary cargo.

52. Any supplementary or house bill transmission that is required must be applied to the primary cargo report, and not to the individual split shipments transmission.

53. A complete list of the information that must be included in the split shipment transmission can be found in Chapter 2: ACI Air ECCRD.

Conveyance Data

54. The conveyance operating carrier or a service provider authorized by that carrier must prepare and transmit an electronic transmission to the CBSA with the required conveyance data within the timeframes as specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

55. There are some exemptions to this requirement and these exemptions are listed in paragraph 134 of this memorandum.

56. Only one conveyance transmission is to be submitted per aircraft. In the case of airline agreements such as code-share/interline agreements, the conveyance operating carrier or a service provider authorized by that carrier is responsible for providing electronic conveyance data for the aircraft.

57. The conveyance data must contain a CRN which is a unique reference number provided for each flight into Canada. The CRN is composed of the flight number as established by the conveyance operating carrier followed by the scheduled date of departure (XX123yymmdd).

58. An accurate estimate of the date and time of arrival at the first Canadian port of arrival provided in Eastern Standard Time (EST) is mandatory.

59. The conveyance operating carrier will be required to transmit a change to the air conveyance transmission to amend the FPOA and/or Estimated Date and Time of Arrival (ETA) to advise the CBSA of any unscheduled re-routes, changes to the ETA greater than 30 minutes, or changes to the aircraft’s itinerary.

60. A change in ETA of less than 30 minutes requires no notification; however, the CBSA may send a risk assessment notice at any time up to the ETA as transmitted on the conveyance report. Therefore, goods are not authorized to move from the warehouse prior to the ETA transmitted on the conveyance report or until the CBSA system updates the status of the conveyance and related cargo, and acknowledges the report of the conveyance and cargo with a Section 12(1) report message to the originator of the CACM.

61. A complete list of the information that must be included in the conveyance data can be found in Chapter 2: ACI Air ECCRD.

Conveyance Arrival Certification Message (CACM)

62. To meet the reporting requirements under section 12(1) of the Customs Act, the conveyance operating carrier must transmit an EDI CACM upon arrival at the FPOA.

63. The CACM is required in addition to the cargo and conveyance Advance Commercial Information (ACI) previously transmitted according to the prescribed timeframes as described in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

64. Conveyances exempt from transmitting ACI data to the CBSA are, therefore, exempt from transmitting the CACM. However, if an air carrier (conveyance operator) choses to voluntarily transmit an electronic ACI conveyance report for an ACI exempt aircraft (i.e. commercial passenger aircraft that are not carrying commercial cargo; empty aircraft), the CACM must be transmitted in order for the arrival status in the CBSA system to be finalized. For example, if a carrier’s common practice is to still transmit an electronic pre-arrival ACI conveyance report for aircraft with no cargo on board, they must also transmit the CACM. Report on arrival requirements under Section 12(1) of the Customs Act, applicable to exempt conveyances are listed in this memorandum, paragraph 134.

65. The arrival process, triggered by the CACM, replaces the arrival process that is based on the ETA provided by clients as part of the advance conveyance data set.

66. The conveyance operating carrier, or a service provider authorized by that carrier to transmit on their behalf, prepares and transmits a CACM to the CBSA through EDI. The CACM message must be transmitted electronically to the CBSA without delay after the aircraft that is transporting specified goods (cargo) is cleared by NAVCAN to land at an airport following arrival in Canada.

67. Upon receipt, validation and acceptance of the CACM, the CBSA system updates the status of the conveyance and related cargo, and acknowledges the arrival of the conveyance with a Section 12(1) “Reported Notice” to the originator of the arrival message. This notice indicates the carrier operating the conveyance (as identified by the CBSA carrier code transmitted within the conveyance report) has met their obligation to report under Section 12(1) of the Customs Act for the conveyance and all shipments detailed on cargo documents that are linked to that conveyance. The CACM will generate any release (for shipments requesting FPOA release)/referral notification messages accordingly. Please refer to the Advance Commercial Information (ACI)/eManifest Non-highway Conveyance Arrival Certification Message Implementation Guide for more information.

68. All Section 12(1) Reported Notices sent to the carrier must be kept on file and made available to the CBSA when requested during compliance monitoring, supported by the requirements in the Transportation of Goods Regulations.

69. For a complete list of the information that must be included in the Conveyance Arrival Certification Message, please refer to the Advance Commercial Information ACI/eManifest Non-highway Conveyance Arrival Certification Message Implementation Guide. For a copy of this guide, please contact the Technical Commercial Client Unit at:

Technical Commercial Client Unit
Canada Border Services Agency
355 North River Road, 6th floor, Tower B
Ottawa ON K1A 0L8
Email: tccu-ustcc@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca
Phone: 1-888-957-7224 (Option 1) calls within Canada and the U.S.; 1-613-946-0762 for overseas callers.

Notifications and Error Messages

70. All pre-arrival data received will be validated and processed through CBSA’s systems, and the CBSA will transmit response messages back to the sender. Notices are sent to the sender via the same route as the incoming transmission.

71. There are two types of response messages clients can expect to receive from CBSA systems when submitting pre-arrival transmissions by electronic means:
(a) Positive responses
(b) Error responses

72. Positive responses are issued in the form of acknowledgements. Acknowledgements are generated when the EDI transmission has successfully passed all syntactical, conformance and validation edits.

73. Error responses are issued in the form of reject notices. An error code will be transmitted to the sender indicating the nature of the error. Carriers must make changes to transmissions in error and re-send to the CBSA in a timely manner.

74. For a complete description of all notifications, error messages and codes and their application, as well as request for information notices, refer to the Electronic Commerce section or Chapter 1: ACI Marine ECCRD.

Manifest Forward

75. For consolidated shipments, freight forwarders are able to nominate their primary carrier as a secondary notify party, enabling the carrier to view house bill data.

76. For more information on Manifest Forward refer to Chapter 11 – ACI eManifest Notices ECCRD.

Risk Assessment Notices

77. Risk assessment notices may be issued when the CBSA requires the client to provide more information regarding the cargo or, to provide the client with specific instructions regarding the unloading of the cargo.

78. Similar to reject notices (or error codes), risk assessment notices will include a coded field identifying the reason the notice was issued and the specific data element requiring clarification or further explanation. In addition, risk assessment notices may also include a free text remarks field providing external clients with additional information concerning the coded field or instructions.

79. CBSA systems will send, ‘Hold’ and/or ‘Cancellation’ coded messages back to the sender and other relevant parties. The message is sent out to the party (ies) via the same electronic means as the incoming transmission. These messages will reference the CCN.

80. For a complete description of all notifications, error messages and codes and their application, as well as risk assessment notices, refer to the Electronic Commerce section or Chapter 2: ACI Air ECCRD. Corrections.

81. In instances where there is an outstanding risk assessment notice AND the importer/broker has received a release notification, the carrier or warehouse operator will hold the shipment until the risk assessment notice is resolved.

82. If there is a “Hold” on a cargo that has been released/acquitted, the “Hold” supersedes the release/acquittal and the cargo cannot be removed from the dock until the “Hold” is removed by the CBSA. Because the cargo has been released/acquitted, the CBSA system will not accept electronic changes. Only a BSF681 including the changes will be accepted and must be sent by fax to the local CBSA office.

Corrections to Cargo and/or Conveyance Data

83. Changes to cargo and/or conveyance data shall be made as soon as they are known.

Add/Change/Delete (Cancel)

84. An “Add” is used for the first transmission (original) of any data, whether it is cargo or conveyance data. It must be transmitted within the timeframes as prescribed in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

85. A “Change” involves the pre-arrival re-transmission of the entire record (all applicable data elements), which will then replace the entire record on file. As a rule, a carrier will be required to transmit a change to update the current conveyance or cargo record when any of the data elements on the current transmission to the CBSA change. Individual data elements are not to be transmitted separately.

86. However, if a CCN on a cargo transmission or the actual CRN on a conveyance transmission needs to be changed, the client must first transmit a record to delete the cargo, or conveyance report, and then transmit an “Add” for the new report with the new CCN, or CRN. A change request will not be accepted in that case.

87. A “Delete” (cancel) is used for the complete removal of records or packages of records. If individual data elements or loops of segments are to be deleted, these must be processed as changes. The specific data transmitted on the delete does not necessarily have to be identical to the original add or change – only the “key” data (i.e. CCN or CRN and whether the record is a cargo or conveyance) must be identical.

88. Deletions may be made at any time up until arrival at the port of report.

Note: Un-arrived cargo and conveyance records are to be deleted (cancelled) if unused within 30 days.

89. For conveyance transmissions, electronic cancellations will be accepted at any time as long as there are no related cargo transmissions on file. If an aircraft is no longer coming to Canada, the electronic conveyance transmission must be deleted.

Failure to Submit Pre-arrival Information

90. The CBSA requires complete information pertaining to all specified goods arriving in Canada. Where no pre-arrival information was transmitted and no other exemption or exception exists, the carrier must transmit a cargo report as soon as it is discovered. Should the CBSA discover goods for which no pre-arrival data was transmitted, and for which no report was made to CBSA, sanctions may be issued to the carrier for non-report.

Unique Shipment Processes

91. The following are not exempt from pre-arrival data; however the reporting and or pre-arrival requirements differ in some manner.

Courier LVS/HVS Requirements

92. Shipments that qualify and are reported under the Courier Low Value Shipment (LVS) Program are exempt from pre-arrival requirements. For additional information concerning the Courier LVS Program please see Memorandum D17-1-2, Reporting and Accounting for Low Value Commercial Goods (Not Exceeding CAD$2,500), and Memorandum 17-4-0, Courier Low Value Shipment Program.

93. However, in situations where one primary air waybill (AWB) documents both LVS shipments, that qualify under the Courier LVS Program, and HVS (High Value Shipments) shipments, pre-arrival cargo transmission accounting for the total weight and piece count is required for all goods listed on the AWB.

94. In these instances, supplementary data for each HVS and one supplementary transmission to account for all courier LVS shipments must be provided. The supplementary transmission for the LVS shipments will indicate “Courier LVS Program Shipments” in the description field; the total weight of all LVS shipments in the weight field; and the total pieces of all LVS shipments in the “lading quantity” field.

95. Should cargo previously reported under the Courier LVS Program be removed from the LVS stream post- arrival through the issuance of Form Y50 by the CBSA, the client is not to transmit pre-arrival data. However, if removed from the LVS stream prior to arrival, full ACI data is required.

96. Should cargo previously reported under the Courier LVS Program be removed from the LVS stream post- arrival by the courier, as the client has identified that the shipment did not qualify under the LVS Program; the client is not to transmit pre-arrival data.

97. Should the client identify that a shipment no longer qualifies for report and release privileges under the Courier LVS Program prior to the shipment’s arrival in Canada, there is both an expectation and an obligation to provide pre-arrival data to the Agency.

In-transit Shipments

98. When cargo arriving in Canada by aircraft is unloaded from the conveyance and moves in-transit through Canada and the air carrier’s contract of carriage ends in a country other than Canada, the in-transit movement type code 23 must be provided. In addition, consignee information must be provided in the consignee name and address fields.

99. When the carrier’s contract of carriage ends in Canada and they are aware that the shipment is in-transit, the CBSA requires that they transmit their cargo as per above, with the in-transit movement type code 23. However, if the carriers system will not accept the code, the words “in-transit” should be provided in the remarks field, along with movement type code 24 (cargo import).

100. The CBSA acknowledges carriers are not always aware that the shipment is in-transit. If this is the case, the pre-arrival requirements differ based on whether supplementary cargo data is required:

  • (a) If there is no supplementary cargo data, then the import movement type, code 24, will be accepted on the cargo transmission. The consignee name and address will be provided in the consignee name and address field. A Canadian name and address will also be transmitted in the delivery address field. This may be a warehouse or rail yard.
  • (b) If there is supplementary cargo data, the cargo transmission will continue to be coded as an import.
    • (i) The shipper and consignee is the freight forwarder.
    • (ii) The supplementary cargo transmission(s) will be coded as an in-transit.
    • (iii) The shipper would be transmitted in the shipper name and address fields.
    • (iv) The consignee in the foreign country would be transmitted in the consignee name and address field.

Freight Remaining on Board (FROB) Cargo

101. For all goods that are FROB in Canada while in-transit to a third country and never intend to be imported into Canada, the conveyance operating carrier must comply with the requirement to provide cargo, and conveyance information within the timeframes specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. The FROB movement type code 26 must be provided.

Airline Agreements

103. Notwithstanding any type of agreements in place, such as code-share, interline, or any variation thereof, only one pre-arrival conveyance transmission, provided by the conveyance operating carrier (or on their behalf by an authorized party), is required for each conveyance arriving in Canada, within the prescribed timeframes outlined in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

104. When sending a cargo transmission for an agreement partner, the conveyance operating carrier must submit the air waybill number using the partner’s air waybill number.

105. However, the airlines that share the aircraft, if authorized by the conveyance operating carrier may transmit cargo information for their own cargo on board the flight, to the CBSA within the prescribed timeframes outlined in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. Although carriers involved in code-share agreements transmit their own flight number for their cargo data, they must provide the CRN as transmitted by the conveyance operating carrier within their primary cargo data.

106. For additional information on pre-arrival requirements toward code-share and interline agreements, please refer to Chapter 2: ACI Air ECCRD.

Emergency Stops

107. Emergency diversions include only diversions resulting from security threats, medical reasons, mechanical reasons, or weather conditions.

108. An aircraft that is not originally destined to Canada, but that is forced to land in Canada due to unforeseen circumstances, may be subject to a review of their paperwork for health, safety, and security risk assessment purposes. This review will be conducted at the aircraft upon arrival and, therefore, pre-arrival data is not required. If it is known, the carrier should contact the CBSA office where the diversion/emergency landing is to occur.

109. When an emergency diversion occurs within Canada, the conveyance operating carrier will be required to notify the National Targeting Centre (NTC) to advise of the diversion and the reason for the diversion prior to aircraft’s arrival at the new airport. The conveyance and all related cargo transmissions must be corrected for port of arrival electronically within the timeframes outlined in paragraphs 28 through to 32 of this memorandum.

NTC: 1-855-NTC-1CNC (1-855-682-1262 within Canada or the U.S.A.) or 1-613-941-0004 (overseas callers – 24 hours a day, 7 days a week).

110. When an emergency diversion occurs outside of Canada, carriers are not required to notify the CBSA. Rather, the pre-arrival conveyance transmission must be corrected as soon as possible to reflect the correct ETA, and routing information. Pre-arrival cargo transmission(s) must also be corrected as soon as possible to reflect any applicable information.

111. If an emergency diversion occurs outside of Canada, and additional cargo is loaded onto the aircraft at the airport to which the aircraft was diverted, the pre-arrival procedures for emergency diversions will not be allowed and, the carrier will be required to update the conveyance transmission and transmit the applicable pre-arrival cargo data for the newly laden cargo within the prescribed timeframes, as outlined in paragraphs 28-32 of this memorandum.

112. All diversions (unless considered an emergency) require the carrier to update the conveyance transmission within the prescribed timeframes.

Goods Found Astray (Misrouted Goods)

113. Carriers must transmit ACI for all goods being transported to Canada, including Canadian goods found astray outside of Canada, unless there is an exemption or exception.

114. Foreign goods found astray in Canada must be electronically transmitted post arrival as soon as they are discovered by the carrier. The goods may then be exported in accordance with the Reporting of Exported Goods Regulations and as outlined in Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements.

Overages

115. Any excess in the number of pieces transmitted in the same shipment and found by the carrier post arrival are considered overages. Carriers are required to report any overages to the CBSA as soon as they are discovered by transmitting a post arrival change to the original cargo transmission. An overage occurs only where pre-arrival data was transmitted and a quantity of goods was initially reported upon arrival at FPOA, and subsequently the number of pieces is found, by the carrier, to exceed the number of pieces reported to the CBSA pre-arrival and upon arrival. If no data was transmitted pre-arrival and no report occurred, and the goods are discovered post arrival, this constitutes non-report, not an overage, and may be subject to penalty action.

Shortages

116. A shortage occurs only where pre-arrival data was transmitted and a quantity of goods was initially reported upon arrival at FPOA, and subsequently the number of pieces found, by the carrier, is less than the number of pieces reported to the CBSA pre-arrival and upon arrival. Carriers are required to report any shortages to the CBSA as soon as they are discovered by transmitting a post arrival change to the original cargo transmission.

Non-resident Importer

117. For shipments being delivered to Canada where the consignee is a non-resident importer, the foreign name and address of the consignee will be accepted in the consignee name and address fields in the cargo transmission.

118. The Canadian party to whom the cargo is being delivered to must be provided in the delivery party name and address fields. The delivery party name and address may be a warehouse, rail yard, etc., if that is where the carrier’s contract of carriage ends.

Transmitting “To Order” Shipments

119. In acknowledgment of common business practices the CBSA will accept “To Order”; “To Order of Shipper”; or “To Order of Bank”; or “Other Named Entity” in the consignee field provided the name and address of the owner or owner’s representative is transmitted as a Notify Party. To help clarify, the following examples illustrate the CBSA’s requirements:

Example 1: “To Order” and “To Order of Shipper”
The CBSA will accept “To Order” and “To Order of Shipper” in the consignee name field. The address information, city name, and country are mandatory fields for the consignee and ideally the shipper’s coordinates would be repeated. However, the CBSA will accept terms such as “Same as Shipper”; “See Above”; etc., in the address information field and city name.

The name and address of the owner or owner’s representative would be provided in the Notify Party fields. The delivery address, if different, would be transmitted in the Delivery Address fields.

Example 2: “To Order of Bank or Other Named Entity”
The name of the bank or the named entity must be transmitted in the consignee name field. Again, because the address information, city name, and country are mandatory fields, the complete address of the bank, or other named entity, must be transmitted in the consignee name and address fields. The name and address of the party taking receipt of the goods in Canada must be transmitted in the Notify Party fields. The delivery address, if different, from the address provided in the Notify Party fields must be transmitted in the Delivery Address fields.

Moving Company and Personal Effects

120. When personal effects are being imported into Canada the name and address of the actual consignee is required. The name of the moving company may be provided in the Notify Party field.

Foreign Aircraft Servicing Equipment

121. Machinery and equipment for use within the confines of an international airport to service inbound and outbound flights of foreign registered aircraft may be imported into Canada without payment of customs duties but are subject to the GST.

122. Pre-arrival cargo and conveyance information pertaining to each initial transportation of foreign aircraft servicing equipment into Canada must be transmitted electronically, within the guidelines and procedures outlined Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

123. For more specific information, refer to Memorandum D8-2-5, Foreign Aircraft Servicing Equipment Remission Order.

Commissary Equipment

124. Foreign airlines operating international flights into Canada may have to replace galley equipment and aircraft furnishings (headrest covers, cabin curtains, etc.) during turn-around periods.

125. Pre-arrival cargo and conveyance information pertaining to each initial transportation of commissary equipment into Canada must be transmitted electronically, within the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations.

ETA - Entered to Arrive and VI - Value Included Shipments

126. Cargo and conveyance data is required for ETA and VI type shipments within the prescribed time frames. The CBSA will manually acquit the cargo data with the original transaction number associated with the goods.

Ships’ Stores (goods imported for ships’ stores)

127. Defined as goods imported into Canada by airlines or vessels specifically for delivery to vessels or a bonded warehouse. Please refer to Memorandum D4-2-1, Ships’ Stores Regulations.

128. Pre-arrival cargo and conveyance information pertaining to goods imported for ships stores into Canada must be transmitted electronically within the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations and this memorandum.

Duty Free Shops (goods imported by duty free shops)

129. Defined as goods imported into Canada by duty free shops and delivered directly to a licensed duty free shop facility. Please refer to Memoranda D4-3-4, Duty Free Shop – Operational Responsibilities and D4-3-5, Duty Free Shop – Inventory Control and sale Requirements for additional information on duty free shops.

130. Pre-arrival cargo and conveyance information pertaining to goods imported and delivered directly to a licensed duty free shop must be transmitted electronically within the guidelines and procedures outlined in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulationsand this memorandum.

Transborder Air Shipments in Highway Service (flying trucks)

131. Where air cargo is being transported by a highway carrier, it is the highway carrier that will transmit their conveyance data to CBSA (within the prescribed highway time frames), quoting the flying trucks cargo exception code. For further information please see Memorandum D3-4-2, Highway Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements. Highway carriers will require a paper air waybill(s) for the air shipments on board the highway conveyance. No pre-arrival data is required from the air carrier. This is an interim process until an electronic multi-modal process is in place for pre-arrival transmissions of air cargo.

ATA Carnet

132. CBSA does not accept the ATA Carnet as a valid cargo ontrol document (CCD) for the import, in-transit, or export movement of goods.

133. Electronic pre-arrival cargo and conveyance data must be transmitted for Carnet import or in-transit shipments within the prescribed timeframes. Carnet shipments arriving in Canada for export must also be accompanied by the appropriate CBSA CCNs for the mode of transport being used. The Carnet must be presented to the CBSA at the time of arrival or export.

ACI Exemptions

134. This section will cover circumstances in which pre-arrival cargo and/or conveyance data is not required under Section 12.1 of the Customs Act. Should clients choose to transmit data for any of the listed exemptions and/or exceptions they must do so within the timeframes specified in the Reporting of Imported Goods Regulations. A complete list of the information that a carrier must include in the conveyance and cargo transmissions is found in Chapter 2: ACI Air ECCRD.

Note: The CBSA will perform periodic monitoring of the records kept by carriers related to electronic conveyance and cargo information, as identified in paragraph 19 in this memorandum. This will include information that may be transmitted, should clients choose to do so, for goods and conveyances that otherwise fall under exemptions/exceptions.

Exemptions From Cargo and Conveyance Data Sets

135. The following are exemptions from cargo and conveyance data sets:

  • (a) CSA Shipments (full load of Customs Self-Assessment (CSA) shipments) – for eligible goods that meet the requirements under Section 10.2 of the Accounting for Imported Goods and Payment of Duties Regulations;
  • (b) Mail (Canada Post, US mail, Diplomatic mail, international) – full load;
  • (c) Military goods on military-owned or military-chartered aircraft – as long as no other cargo is on board;
  • (d) Emergency/non-emergency repairs;
  • (e) Emergency diversions (only for original shipments not intended to arrive in Canada);
  • (f) Empty aircraft – when aircraft is the imported goods/cargo (Note: empty aircraft/no cargo);
  • (g) Commercial passenger aircraft not carrying specified goods;
  • (h) Emergency response vehicles/personnel/equipment for use in emergency situations such as:
    • (i) transportation of human organs for transplant,
    • (ii) first response fire brigades,
    • (iii) ambulance patient transport,
    • (iv) teams assisting in disaster relief circumstances;
  • (i) Transborder air shipments in highway services (flying trucks) [interim process only];
  • (j) Specified goods on board a conveyance that enters Canadian airspace while it is proceeding directly from one place outside of Canada to another place outside of Canada without landing in Canada;
  • (k) Hand carried goods (when no other specified goods are on board, i.e. empty conveyance);
  • (l) Dunnage – packaging material such as boards, blocks, planks, metal or plastic bracing, used in supporting and securing packages for shipping and handling.

Exceptions From Cargo Data – Only Conveyance Data Required

136. The following are exceptions from cargo data – only conveyance data required:

(a) Goods that are being imported into Canada under the Courier Low Value Shipment (LVS) Program by an approved courier under the CBSA Courier LVS Program [please see the courier LVS/HVS requirements section of this memorandum];

(b) Mail (Canada Post, US mail, diplomatic mail, international) – as part of a mixed load.

Authorized Use of Foreign Aircraft

137. A foreign non-tax paid aircraft involved in international commercial transportation is restricted to international flights from a point abroad to a point or points in Canada and return to a point abroad. The carriage of Canadian residents to, and their arrival from, foreign destinations is permitted provided the flight is limited to international service. Any foreign aircraft that ceases to be involved in international commercial transportation while in Canadian airspace must be immediately reported to the CBSA and formally accounted for as it is deemed to have been imported.

Note: Electronic and/or paper reports of the aircraft’s arrival in Canada are required as outlined in this memorandum.

138. With the exception of paragraph 137, under no circumstances may a foreign non-tax paid empty aircraft enter Canada for the sole purpose of carrying passengers or goods point-to-point in Canada. In this situation, it is deemed that the aircraft is imported for that specific purpose and is not performing an international air service. If the aircraft is deemed to have been imported; all duties and taxes are to be paid immediately. Furthermore, any unauthorized use of a foreign non-tax paid aircraft in Canada could result in the issuance of monetary penalties or the seizure and forfeiture of the aircraft.

139. From time to time, non-tax paid foreign aircraft are chartered by groups of non-residents who wish to visit several Canadian centers. Normally, the point-to-point carriage of passengers by a non-tax paid non-Canadian aircraft would be considered an unauthorized movement. However, such movements are allowed if the passengers originated outside Canada and are initially brought into Canada by a carrier that is operating under a continuing tour charter.

140. Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) approval for a flight does not constitute authority for a non-tax paid aircraft to engage in gainful operations between points in Canada. For additional information on CTA licences please see paragraphs 146 to 148 of this memorandum.

Tariff Treatment of Aircraft in International Service

141. For the purposes of this memorandum, a Canadian aircraft is defined as an aircraft engaged in international commercial transportation which is registered in Canada, and

  • (a) was built in Canada;
  • (b) all duties have been paid; or
  • (c) has been deemed to be duty paid under the terms of some other Act.

142. Canadian aircraft in international commercial service are to be classified under tariff item No. 9813.00.00 or 9814.00.00, provided they satisfy all the relevant requirements outlined in the provisions of these tariff items. Where Canadian aircraft arriving in Canada do not qualify for importation under either of these tariff items (for example when repairs have been done abroad), they are to be classified under the appropriate tariff item in Chapter 88 of the Customs Tariff.

143. Where a Canadian aircraft in international commercial service has been repaired or enhanced while abroad, all such repairs or enhancements shall be reported to the CBSA and duly accounted for upon the aircraft’s first return to Canada, even if the aircraft is continuing in international commercial service. (See Repair Abroad of Canadian Civil Aircraft, Canadian Aircraft Engines and Flight Simulators Remission Order.)

144. Any aircraft that is not a “Canadian aircraft” as defined in paragraph 141 above is deemed to be a foreign aircraft for CBSA purposes and, if in international commercial service, should be classified under tariff item No. 9801.10.10.

145. No formal accounting is required for aircraft engaged in international commercial service, however all aircraft entering Canada (Canadian or foreign) must be reported as outlined in this memorandum.

Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) Licences

146. In addition to complying with CBSA requirements for aircraft involved in international service, most commercial air carriers also require a licence from the CTA. Licences fall into three general categories and include:

147. Non-Canadian air carriers providing a commercial air service authorized under a licence issued by the CTA, cannot embark passengers or cargo at one point in Canada to transport to another point in Canada. However, the licensee may provide a stopover at any point in Canada that is restricted to passengers boarded in the United States who will subsequently be returned to that territory. In this case, the aircraft must remain with the passengers unless the use of two different aircraft is specified in the terms of the charter contract.

148. For complete information on CTA licensing requirements, aircraft groupings, and charter types, you may contact:

Secretary
Canadian Transportation Agency
Ottawa ON  K1A 0N9
or call
during normal hours: 819-997-6359
after normal hours: 613-769-6274

Note: In addition, CTA licensing information can be found on the Canadian Transportation Agency’s Web site. The search function can be used to verify if a carrier has the necessary CTA license authority.

Provision of CBSA Services

149. For a list of services available at CBSA Offices please refer to the Directory of CBSA offices.

Passenger Restrictions

150. At certain airports, the number of international passengers processed by the CBSA at a given time may be restricted due to operational or safety requirements. In some locations where passenger restrictions are in place, staged off-loading may be allowed to accommodate larger aircraft. The air carrier or its agent is responsible for controlling the delivery of passengers. For more information about staged off-loading, see Memorandum D2-5-1, Charter Access to Airports.

151. The business hours and types of CBSA services available at designated airports of entry (AOE) may vary according to the type of airport, geographical location, facilities, or season. Office information, including addresses, hours of operation, and types of services available, may be found in the Directory of CBSA Offices.

152. Cost recovery or special service charges for new or additional CBSA services (such as OGD) may apply at certain airports. Information on Special Services can be found in Memorandum D1-2-1, Special Services, or you may contact the local CBSA office at the airport of destination.

Charter Access to Airports

153. Guidelines and conditions related to operating international passenger charter services (for remuneration or hire) and obtaining inspection services for passenger clearance related to international charter services may be found in Memorandum D2-5-1, Charter Access to Airports. Memorandum D2-5-1 only deals with passenger clearance.

154. At certain airports, the CBSA may require notice before they accept international air traffic. Airlines should communicate with the local CBSA office at the airport of destination regarding prior notification requirements.

Note: Prior notification is not the same as advance notification. Advance electronic conveyance notification requirements also apply to aircraft carrying cargo, as outlined in this memorandum.

General Conveyance Reporting – All Commercial Aircraft

155. All commercial aircraft (passenger and/or cargo) must report to and land at a Canadian authorized Airport of Entry (AOE). In addition, commercial cargo aircraft or passenger aircraft carrying commercial goods must report to and land at an AOE that provides commercial services during the regularly scheduled hours of operation. Special permission must be obtained to report to a non-authorized AOE, an AOE not equipped with commercial services (if carrying commercial goods), or to report outside of business hours. Information on Special Services can be found in Memorandum D1-2-1, Special Services, or you may contact the local CBSA office at the airport of destination.

General Reporting Guidelines and Procedures for ACI Exemptions

156. All exemptions to ACI electronic notification will be reported using one of the following cargo control documents, or as otherwise outlined in this memorandum:

  • (a) The carrier may use the standard Form A8A(B), In Bond – Cargo Control Document, available (in limited quantities) at all CBSA offices or use a privately printed document in a format that is acceptable to the CBSA. To order Form A8A(B) or other CBSA forms, please call 1-800-959-2221 (in Canada) or 1-905-712-5813 (from outside Canada), or submit an online order form available on the CBSA web site. Cargo control document specifications can be found in Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods, and completion instructions for Form A8A(B) also in Memorandum D3-1-1.
  • (b) The International Air Transport Association (IATA) format air waybill is an approved cargo control document for reporting cargo to the CBSA and does not require CBSA approval for its use. At the point of lading, the air carrier should ensure that all applicable fields on the air waybill are completed accurately and legibly. You will find a copy of an IATA air waybill as well as the instructions for completing the waybill in Appendix B of this memorandum.
  • (c) The IATA format air express waybill is an approved cargo control document for reporting cargo to the CBSA. CBSA approval is not required to use this document. You will find a copy of an IATA air express waybill as well as the instructions for completing the waybill in Appendix C of this memorandum.
  • (d) Mail bags must be accompanied by one of the above-mentioned cargo control documents, in addition to the Universal Postal Union (UPU) delivery bill.
  • (e) Other acceptable cargo control document

Manner of Reporting – ACI Exempt Imports

157. Non-bonded air carriers must report all shipments to the CBSA at the FPOA. This report consists of five copies of an approved cargo control document. After verification, all copies of the document are numbered when required and date stamped by the CBSA. To keep the information legible, date stamps should be applied to the reverse side of the documents. Two copies (Mail and Station) are kept by the CBSA. Two copies (Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority) are given to the importer or agent of the importer for presentation to the CBSA with the release document(s) at the CBSA office of release. The warehouse operator copy is given to the warehouse operator to serve as an inventory control copy.

158. Bonded air carriers may report import shipments at either the FPOA or at the destination airport indicated on the waybill. All airports used en route to the final airport of destination must be indicated clearly on the waybill. The destination airport may only change if the carrier has filed a re-manifest or diversion.

159. Bonded carriers require five copies of the IATA air waybill or cargo control document for CBSA purposes. This report consists of five copies of an approved cargo control document. After verification, all copies of the document are numbered when required and date stamped by the CBSA. To keep the information legible, date stamps should be applied to the reverse side of the documents. Two copies (Mail and Station) are kept by the CBSA. Two copies (Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority) are given to the importer or agent of the importer for presentation to the CBSA with the release document(s) at the CBSA office of release. The warehouse operator copy is given to the warehouse operator to serve as an inventory control copy.

160. When cargo is covered by an air waybill other than the conveyance operating carrier’s air waybill, the front of the document must be clearly stamped with the conveyance operating carrier’s correct name and carrier code before presentation to the CBSA. Instead of stamping each air waybill, carriers may present their documents in envelopes clearly marked “CBSA Cargo Report” giving the name and code of the conveyance operating carrier.

161. When in bond shipments are to be shipped beyond the final point indicated on the air waybill, the shipment must be moved by a bonded carrier and properly re-manifested.

Manner of Reporting – ACI Exempt In-transit/FROB Shipments

Bonded and Non-bonded Carriers

162. Foreign goods destined to a foreign airport and landed at Canadian airports in the services of non-bonded and bonded air carriers do not need to be documented for CBSA purposes, provided they remain on board the aircraft and no layover is necessary.

163. If the goods will not be exported immediately, they must be documented and reported to the CBSA on an IATA air waybill, or on Form A8A(B), In Bond – Customs Cargo Control Document. A copy of an IATA air waybill and corresponding completion instructions may be found in Appendix B of this Memorandum. Completion instructions for Form A8A(B) are found in Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods.

Diversions and Transfers – Requirements for ACI Exemptions

164. It is not necessary to re-document goods that are re-routed from the destination airport indicated on the cargo control document to a second airport in the service of and on the same billing as the original reporting carrier. However, the carrier who was in control of the shipment at the time of diversion is responsible for preparing a Form A30, Diversion Notice, in duplicate and attaching both copies to the long room copy of the cargo control document.

165. The diversion notice and cargo control document is given to the importer or connecting carrier if interlined, and presented with the relevant release documents at the CBSA office of release. The diversion notice remains with the accounting document until numbered.

166. If the carrier chooses, the diversion notice may be prepared in triplicate, and the third copy date stamped and returned to the carrier.

167. No more than one diversion of the same shipment is allowed.

168. The diversion notice is supplied by the carrier in 21.5 cm by 14 cm (8 1/2 by 5 1/2 inches) size and printed on blue paper.

169. For more detailed information on diversions, refer toMemorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods.

Emergency Landing Cargo Reporting Guidelines for ACI Exemptions

Import/Inbound goods

170. If an aircraft carrying cargo for import is forced to land at an airport short of its intended destination due to weather conditions, mechanical issues affecting the safety and security of the aircraft and passengers, or medical situations requiring immediate attention, the conveyance operating carrier is advised to provide verbal notification of the details of the emergency landing to the CBSA at the airport of emergency landing (or the closest airport with CBSA commercial clearance capabilities) and the airport of original destination. For a listing of CBSA offices and the types of services offered, please see the Directory of CBSA offices.

171. If the cargo will remain on board the aircraft while at the emergency landing site, or be transferred to a replacement aircraft for transportation to the original airport of destination for CBSA clearance, generally, no additional paperwork, such as a diversion notice, will be required at the time of clearance to document the emergency landing. Clients should verify with the CBSA at the airport of destination whether a diversion notice is required, or not.

172. If the cargo is being presented for clearance at the emergency landing site (if CBSA commercial clearance is available), diversion documentation must accompany the clearance/release paperwork. Diversion documentation requirements and procedures are outlined in paragraphs 168 to 173 of this memorandum.

In-transit goods

173. The following procedures apply to in-transit cargo that has landed in Canada as a result of weather conditions, mechanical issues affecting the safety and security of the aircraft and passengers, or medical situations requiring immediate attention:

  • (a) The conveyance operating carrier is advised to provide verbal notification of the details of the emergency landing to the CBSA at the airport of emergency landing (or the closest airport with CBSA commercial clearance capabilities).
  • (b) The cargo may be transferred from one aircraft to another only under CBSA supervision, and the identifying markings of the replacement aircraft and a brief notation of the circumstances must be provided to the CBSA.
  • (c) At the discretion of the airline, the cargo may be forwarded to the United States by a bonded highway carrier on an IATA air waybill or other CBSA approved cargo control document indicating complete details of each shipment. In the case of mail bags, the cargo control document must show the number of bags and describe the goods as “mail bags.” The document must be prepared in triplicate and numbered from the local series. One copy will be returned to the carrier for presentation to the CBSA at the point of exit. The remaining copies will serve as the mail and station copies.
  • (d) The transfer of the cargo from the aircraft to the truck must be conducted under the supervision of a border services officer who will seal the vehicle with a CBSA seal(s) and note the seal(s) number(s) on the cargo control document. If the seals are intact at the point of exit, the vehicle may be allowed to proceed without further examination.
  • (e) Where the goods have to be removed from the aircraft and held pending availability of another aircraft or a bonded carrier’s vehicle, they must be placed in a sufferance warehouse. The goods must be reported to the CBSA on an IATA air waybill or other CBSA approved cargo control document. At the time of transfer, the applicable procedures outlined in paragraph (b) or (d) of this section must be followed.

174. Carriers that are not bonded cannot carry in bond cargo beyond the CBSA office of arrival. However, when a non-bonded foreign aircraft carrying goods into Canada makes an emergency landing short of its final destination, it may continue to the final destination without posting a single trip bond. In this case, the cargo must be reported to the CBSA at the initial CBSA office. When stopovers occur at either Gander or Goose Bay, carriers may continue to destination after presenting Form AG1, General Declaration (Outward/ Inward) to the CBSA, or report the goods at the initial CBSA office.

175. To ensure control, the initial CBSA office of report is to advise the CBSA at the final destination of the carrier’s expected arrival.

176. The cargo control document is numbered and date stamped by the CBSA. When the initial CBSA office is non-automated, the mail copy of the cargo control document is mailed to the CBSA office of destination. Otherwise, it is keyed into the automated system. The Station copy is filed, and the long room, CBSA delivery authority, and warehouse operator copies are returned to the carrier for reporting at final destination.

177. At destination, the long room and CBSA delivery authority copies are given to the importer for presentation with the release document(s) at the CBSA office of release, and the warehouse operator copy to the warehouse operator to serve as an inventory control copy.

Split Shipment Reporting Procedures for ACI Exemptions

178. Split shipments (part lots) occur when portions of a shipment covered by one air waybill enter the country at different times due to carrier capacity constraints.

179. Under this procedure, the air carrier must report all parts of the split shipment as they arrive.

180. All parts of a split shipment are controlled under the original air waybill number. The procedure requires a “Split Shipment” stamp on the original air waybill report and on all copies of the original air waybill used to report the subsequent parts of the split shipment. The number of pieces that have arrived must be indicated in the appropriate field of the “Split Shipment” stamp, e.g. 1st Part – 20 pieces.

181. For purposes of uniformity, the “Split Shipment” stamp used by the airlines must be similar to that shown below:

Split Shipment Received by:
Carrier’s name:
Name of airport:

As follows:
1st Part – __ pieces
2nd Part – __ pieces
3rd Part – __ pieces
4th Part – __ pieces
Final Part – __ pieces

182. Split shipments consigned to a freight forwarder are processed as follows:

  • (a) when the initial part of the shipment arrives, the conveyance operating air carrier prepares the original air waybill. The total quantity for the entire shipment is shown in the “No. of packages” box. All copies must be stamped with the “Split Shipment” stamp completed, showing “1st Part – X pieces”;
  • (b) the conveyance operating air carrier must give one copy of the original air waybill (Mail) to the CBSA and two copies (Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority) to the de-consolidator;
  • (c) the freight forwarder must prepare secondary cargo reports (housebills/advice notes) to cover the total quantity of the shipment cancelling the full quantity declared on the original air waybill. The de-consolidator must give the mail and station copies of all of the secondary cargo reports along with two copies (Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority) of the original air waybill to the CBSA. The long room and CBSA delivery authority copies of the secondary cargo report(s) for those goods that have arrived will be given to the importer, or agent of the importer, for presentation with the release document(s) to the CBSA;
  • (d) the long room and CBSA delivery authority copies of the secondary cargo report covering those goods that have not yet arrived must be held in the de-consolidator’s open file pending the arrival of those goods, when the remaining portions of the shipment arrive, the reporting air carrier must give one copy of the original air waybill to both the CBSA and the de-consolidator. The “Split Shipment” stamp identifying the part of the shipment that has arrived and the number of pieces received must be completed on the air waybill. The long room and CBSA delivery authority copies of the secondary cargo reports previously prepared and held in the freight forwarders open file are now given to the importer, or agent of the importer, for presentation to the CBSA with the release document(s) for that portion of the shipment.

183. Although secondary cargo reports are required for the total quantity of the complete shipment, the freight forwarder is only responsible for the quantity shown on the “Split Shipment” stamp. If the goods not covered by the “Split Shipment” stamp cannot be produced or accounted for, the air carrier is responsible for the shortage.

184. Split shipments consigned to an importer are processed as follows:

  • (a) when the initial part of the shipment arrives, the conveyance operating air carrier prepares the air waybill. The total quantity for the entire shipment is shown in the “No. of packages” box. All copies of the air waybill must be stamped with the “Split Shipment” stamp completed to show “1st Part – X Pieces” to identify the part of the shipment being reported and the number of pieces received;
  • (b) the conveyance operating air carrier must give one copy of the air waybill (Mail) to the CBSA and two copies (Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority) to the importer for presentation to the CBSA with the release document(s);
  • (c) the importer may obtain release of portions of the shipment as they arrive or may wait until all portions of the shipment have arrived before obtaining their release from the CBSA;
  • (d) to obtain release of the entire shipment at one time, the importer must present all copies of the original air waybill (Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority) with the release document(s) for the entire shipment;
  • (e) to obtain release of a portion of the shipment as it arrives, the importer must present two copies (Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority) of the original air waybill with the release document(s) to the CBSA. All copies must be stamped with the “Split Shipment” stamp completed to identify the part of the shipment being reported and the number of pieces received. Although only part of the shipment is being released, the duty and taxes for the entire shipment must be paid by the importer, when the remaining portions of the shipment arrive, the reporting air carrier must give one copy of the original air waybill (Mail) to the CBSA and two copies (Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority) to the importer for presentation with the release document(s) to the CBSA. All copies must be stamped with the “Split Shipment” stamp completed to identify the part of the shipment being reported and the number of pieces received. The subsequent portions are to be released using the procedures for the release of short-shipped goods, as outlined in Memorandum D17-1-5, Registration, Accounting and Payment for Commercial Goods.

Specific Guidelines Related to ACI Notification Exemptions

Mail

185. Carriers transporting international mail will report all international mail to the CBSA on a properly completed air waybill or other acceptable CCD, clearly indicating in the cargo description field that the cargo is International Mail. The universal postal manifest prepared by the foreign mail service should be attached to the air waybill.

186. International mail is transferred in bond under the control of the air carrier’s air waybill or if moved by a secondary carrier (under the secondary cargo control document of the secondary carrier) or by the Canada Post Corporation. The mail is transferred to one of the CBSA international mail exchange offices where it is processed in accordance with the guidelines and procedures outlined in Memorandum D5-1-1, Canada Border Services Agency International Mail Processing System.

187. Diplomatic mail must also be reported to the CBSA on a properly completed air waybill or other acceptable CCD, clearly indicating in the cargo description field that the cargo is diplomatic mail. Only those authorized to pick up diplomatic mail will be allowed to remove diplomatic mail from CBSA control. The CBSA at each airport handling the arrival of diplomatic mail will maintain a list of those parties or individuals authorized to pick up diplomatic mail. Consulates or embassies must ensure that any changes to the list are communicated in a timely fashion to the airport of entry or appropriate regional program area contact.

Military Goods on Military-owned or Military-chartered Aircraft

188. Military goods arriving on military-owned or military chartered aircraft are reported on an air waybill or other acceptable CCD at the airport of arrival in Canada.

189. Military goods arriving on board a non-military owned or chartered aircraft must be transmitted electronically in accordance with the ACI notification guidelines outlined in this memorandum.

Commercial Goods Carried by a Passenger his/her own Baggage

190. Commercial goods carried by a passenger in his/her own baggage on board a commercial passenger aircraft must be declared by the passenger on Form E311, Declaration Card.

191. A cargo control document or EDI cargo transmission is not required when a shipment is being transported by the importer in his/her own baggage on board a commercial passenger flight AND the shipment is accounted for at the initial CBSA office of report by presenting a Form B3-3, Canada Customs Coding Form, type C and payment of all applicable duties and taxes.

192. If the B3 is presented by a broker/agent on behalf of the importer at the time of arrival at the initial CBSA office of report, a cargo control document may be required. If a cargo control document is required, the broker/agent’s carrier/identifier code is the carrier code that should be quoted on the cargo control document, if the importer does not have a carrier identifier code of their own.

Transborder Air Shipments in Highway Service (flying trucks)

193. Bonded air carriers that are providing international air service for transporting cargo may use the services of a highway carrier (secondary carrier) to transport air cargo into Canada. The highway carrier does not require a letter of authorization from the bonded air carrier in order to move the goods under the bonded air carrier’s documentation.

194. The following procedures apply when air cargo is transported into Canada via highway mode:

  • (a) The highway carrier that has contracted with the air carrier reports the goods to the CBSA at the highway frontier on behalf of the air carrier by presenting the bonded air carrier’s properly completed air waybill, which serves as the air carrier’s report of the goods to the CBSA. If consolidated shipments are presented – consigned to a freight forwarder – a continuation sheet must be attached outlining the required shipment details for each shipment in the consolidated shipment (same information as required on a house bill), which include: actual shipper, ultimate consignee, weight, piece count, and complete description of the goods.
  • (b) The cargo control number on the air waybill will include the carrier code of the air carrier, not the highway carrier, and the air waybill must show the Canadian airport as the ultimate destination airport.
  • (c) The goods must be delivered into a type AA or AH sufferance warehouse licensed to receive air cargo.
  • (d) The highway or air carrier must not report again to the CBSA at the airport of destination, as this would create duplicate manifests within the CBSA inventory system.
  • (e) The border services officer at the highway frontier retains the mail and station copies of the air waybill as proof of report.
  • (f) The highway carrier provides the long-room and CBSA delivery authority copies of the air waybill to the importer or agent of the importer for presentation to the CBSA with the release document(s) at the airport of release. One copy (warehouse operator) is given to the warehouse operator as an inventory control copy.

195. The air carrier assumes full liability for the goods. Any tracers or penalties for cargo infractions are applied against the primary air carrier.

196. In-transit air shipments that are destined to a third country may move by highway carrier to a Canadian airport for export provided:

  • (a) the goods are reported at the frontier by the highway carrier;
  • (b) the report is in the form of a single copy of each air waybill.

197. For policies and procedures related to the export portion of the movement of in transit air shipments moving by highway, please see Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements.

198. No formal acquittal is required for these in-transit export reports as audits are made against the carrier’s records.

199. Air carriers not complying with the above requirements are to have their highway substitution privileges revoked, and the shipments treated as normal highway movements.

200. For vehicle sealing requirements please see Memorandum D3-4-2, Highway Pre-arrival and Reporting Requirements sealing requirements for air cargo being transported by a highway carrier are based on the carrier status of the air carrier. Where highway and air cargo are being transported in the same vehicle, all highway cargo must be reported and processed as outlined in Memorandum D3-4-2.

Small Parcel Service and LVS Courier Program Cargo

201. A number of airlines operating transborder into Canadian airports have special procedures for the rapid movement of small parcels of urgently required materials. This is a premium rate operation normally used for the movement of magnetic tapes, printouts, business correspondence, business statements, news material, films, etc. For further information on clearance procedures for this type of shipment, see Memorandum D8-2-16, Courier Imports Remission.

202. While the procedure was designed by carriers to expedite the movement of small single shipments, various courier services are using the system to move a number of small shipments contained in one package and documented on one air waybill. Such instances are considered to be consolidations, and the courier service involved must break the package down on Form A10, Cargo Control Abstract, or on an approved consist sheet if the shipment qualifies under Memorandum D8-2-16, Courier Imports Remission, or on a Cargo/Release List for approved Courier Low Value Shipment Program participants. For additional information, please see Memorandum D17-1-2, Reporting and Accounting for Low Value Commercial Goods (Not Exceeding CAD $2,500)and the Consist Sheet Clearance Process and Memorandum D8-2-16. Further information on Form A10 may be found in Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods.

203. Courier parcel shipments carried in bond under exclusive charter arrangements may be delivered directly to the courier’s sufferance warehouse or to its contracted agent at the airport of destination.

Empty Aircraft – When Aircraft is the Goods/Cargo

Documentation requirements for the report of imported commercial aircraft

204. All empty aircraft that are imported, temporarily or permanently, are to be reported on a CBSA approved cargo control document by the party transporting the aircraft at the airport of arrival.

Commercial aircraft

205. Commercial air carriers will generally report imported commercial aircraft on an IATA air waybill, CBSA cargo control document, form A8A(B), or an approved alternative. If the importation is temporary in nature, such as: aircraft imported for demonstration, repair, or alteration, then the commercial air carrier should clearly indicate this in the cargo description section. The anticipated length of the temporary importation should also be indicated in the description section; for example: “aircraft being temporarily imported for demonstration until (indicate date)”. Additional accounting or release documents may be required for temporary importations. For additional information on the accounting or release documentation for temporary importations, please see paragraphs 230 to 232 in this memorandum, and Memorandum D8-1-1, Amendments to Temporary Importation (Tariff Item No. 9993.00.00) Regulations.

Corporate aircraft

206. Corporate aircraft being imported, permanently or temporarily, will generally be reported on an A8A(B) cargo control document (or other CBSA approved cargo document) by the party transporting the aircraft. Additional accounting or release documents will be required for permanent importation and for most temporary importations. For additional information on the accounting or release documentation for permanent importations, please see Memorandum D17-1-5, Registration, Accounting and Payment for Commercial Goods. For additional information on the accounting or release documentation for temporary importations, please see paragraphs 230 to 232 in this memorandum, and Memorandum D8-1-1, Amendments to Temporary Importation (Tariff Item No. 9993.00.00) Regulations.

207. The air waybill, A8A(B) or other approved cargo report is to be presented to the CBSA, along with any applicable release documentation, as outlined in the “General Reporting Guidelines and Procedures for ACI Exemptions” in paragraph 156 of this memorandum.

Documentation requirements when the transporter is also the importer

208. When the party transporting the corporate or commercial aircraft is the importer of the aircraft, a cargo control document will not be required if the importer obtains release of, and accounts for, the goods (aircraft) by presenting a Form B 3-3, Canada Customs Coding Form, type C, cash accounting document at the initial CBSA office of report. This applies to permanently or temporarily imported commercial and corporate aircraft.

Release/accounting documentation requirements for foreign aircraft temporarily imported

Aircraft for Repair

209. Aircrafts may be temporarily imported into Canada for repair. “Repair” is defined as “a corrective maintenance activity, which may include replacing or re-fixing parts, in order to restore the article to its original operating condition.”

210. All goods entering Canada, even those imported temporarily, are subject to duties and taxes (including the goods and services tax/harmonized sales tax (GST/HST)) on their full value, unless there is specific legislation in place that will entirely or partially relieve the importer of this obligation. In the case of aircraft temporarily imported for repair, the customs duties are relieved under tariff item No. 9993.00.00, and the goods qualify for full relief of the GST/HST under the provisions of paragraph 3(d) of the Non-Taxable Imported Goods (GST/HST) Regulations. For further information on temporarily importing goods under tariff item No. 9993.00.00 see Memorandum D8-1-1, Amendments to Temporary Importation (Tariff Item No. 9993.00.00) Regulations.

Aircraft for Alteration

211. For the purposes of a good imported temporarily for alteration, an “alteration” is defined as “a modification, other than a repair, which does not include an operation or process that either destroys the essential characteristics of a good or creates a new or commercially different good.” Aircraft imported temporarily for alteration qualify for full relief of the GST/HST under the provisions of Item 16 of the Schedule to the Temporary Importation (Excise Levies and Additional Duties) Regulations. However, goods imported temporarily for alteration do not qualify under tariff item No. 9993.00.00. Importers who want to temporarily import goods for alteration should consider the CBSA’s duty deferral and drawback programs (see Memorandum D7-4-1, Duties Relief Program and D7-4-2, Duty Drawback Program).

Aircraft for Demonstration

212. As explained in Memorandum D8-1-9, Imported Demonstration Aircraft Remission Order, aircraft may be temporarily imported for demonstration purposes without the payment of the GST.

213. Aircrafts imported for demonstration purposes are to be imported on Form E29B, Temporary Admission Permit. Any aircraft sold in Canada is to be formally accounted for immediately to cancel Form E29B. See Memorandum D8-1-9, Imported Demonstration Aircraft Remission Order for complete instructions.

General Advance Notification Requirements for ACI Exempt Air Conveyances

214. An AG1 – General Declaration (Outward/Inward), is not required for the notification of scheduled flights of commercial aircraft (carrying commercial goods) that are exempt from ACI electronic advance notification requirements in most cases. The AG1 may be required for the report of non-scheduled flights of commercial aircraft at smaller airports. Please contact the CBSA office at the airport of arrival for the reporting documentation requirements for unscheduled ACI exempt aircraft. All air cargo must be reported as outlined in this memorandum.

215. Scheduled or non-scheduled commercial carriers operating international flights will not be required to submit Form AG1, or equivalent documentation for the deplaning of passengers and crew. For reporting requirements for passengers and crew on board commercial aircraft, please see Memoranda D2-5-6, Aircrew Reporting and D2-5-11, Administrative and Operational Guidelines for Commercial Air-mode Carriers for the Processing of Prescribed Traveller Information Pursuant to the Requirements of the Canada Border Services Agency. For corporate aircraft passenger and crew reporting guidelines please see Memorandum D2-5-12, Telephone Reporting for General Aviation and Marine Pleasure Craft. There may be occasions when a general declaration is required by the aircraft operator as proof of report into and exit from Canada. As a courtesy, the CBSA will continue to validate this document with a CBSA date stamp.

216. For information related to the conveyance reporting of aircraft departing Canada, please see Memorandum D3-1-8, Cargo – Export Movements.

Specific Requirements for ACI Exempt Air Conveyances

Commercial Passenger Aircraft Not Carrying Commercial Cargo

217. Scheduled or non-scheduled commercial carriers operating international passenger flights will not be required to submit a paper report for the arrival of the aircraft – Form AG1, General Declaration (Outward/Inward), or an equivalent document for deplaning passengers and crew when they are processed by border services officers at a CBSA facility established for that purpose. Passengers and crew are to be reported in accordance with API/PNR guidelines as outlined in Memorandum D2-5-11, Administrative and Operational Guidelines for Commercial Air-mode Carriers for the Processing of Prescribed Traveller Information Pursuant to the Requirements of the Canada Border Services Agencyand/or Memorandum D2-5-6, Aircrew Reporting.

Canadian Military Aircraft

218. Aircrafts operated (owned or chartered) by the Canadian Armed Forces are not permitted to carry in bond goods between points in Canada since the Armed Forces is not a bonded carrier.

219. All aircrafts must make their initial landing in Canada at an authorized airport of entry (AOE) when flying internationally and carrying merchandise, baggage, or persons other than regular crew members. The pilot is responsible for any advance notice required, for the report inward and the declaration to the CBSA of all passengers, cargo, and baggage carried on the flight.

Foreign Military Aircraft

220. Aircrafts operated by armed forces of foreign nations are required to report to the CBSA at the time of initial landing in Canada. They are subject to all CBSA requirements when used to transport personnel, baggage, equipment, mail, or other cargo. Where only a short stopover is involved and no goods are being carried outward that require export documentation, the inward and outward reports will be made at the same time. Aircraft carrying crew members only may report verbally; however, the CBSA may choose to examine the aircraft or the crew’s baggage.

Air Search and Rescue Operations

221. Canadian Armed Forces Rescue Co-ordination Centres (RCC) have been established at several locations in Canada. The CBSA co-operates in every possible manner to expedite the international movement of aircrafts operating on search and rescue missions.

222. When an incident arises in either Canada or the United States where aircraft of one or both countries will be crossing the boundary, the officer in charge of the RCC search will immediately provide the CBSA with the following:

  • (a) full details of all aircrafts participating in the operation, including identification markings and number of crew members;
  • (b) territory to be searched;
  • (c) duration of stay;
  • (d) possibility of landings; and
  • (e) definite or probable landing points.

Note: If the information affects territory under the jurisdiction of more than one CBSA office, it should be relayed promptly to all concerned.

223. Additional information on the reporting and accounting requirements for goods (including aircraft) brought into Canada in response to an emergency or for an emergency response training exercise are included in this memorandum.

224. Goods (including aircraft) brought into Canada in response to an emergency or for an emergency response training exercise qualify for customs duty-free importation under tariff item No. 9993.00.00, provided any goods which are not consumed or destroyed are exported. No advance notification of the cargo will be required for goods qualifying under tariff item 9993.00.00. The Goods for Emergency Use Remission Orderrelieves the GST/HST on the goods which are exported, consumed or destroyed. Any items not consumed, destroyed or exported will be subject to applicable duties and taxes. Checklists of goods brought into Canada in response to an emergency or emergency response training exercise (aircraft, equipment, merchandise and supplies) should be maintained where necessary. Material from foreign wrecks should be carefully inventoried subject to exportation or importation. All goods brought into Canada that are not brought in, in direct response to an emergency or as part of an emergency training exercise are subject to the cargo and conveyance advance notification requirements applicable to all cargo and conveyances outlined in this memorandum. For additional information about the Goods for Emergency Use Remission Order and tariff item No. 9993.00.00, please see Memorandum D8-1-1, Amendments to Temporary Importation (Tariff Item No. 9993.00.00) Regulations.

Empty Aircraft

225. Empty aircrafts are not required to provide an electronic ACI conveyance report. An AG1 – General Declaration for the report of the aircraft as a conveyance may be required for unscheduled flights. Please contact the CBSA office at the airport of arrival for the documentation requirements for unscheduled ACI exempt aircraft.

Temporary Importations of Empty Foreign Aircraft (where the aircraft is the cargo/commercial goods)

226. Commercial or corporate aircraft temporarily imported into Canada (i.e. for demonstration, repair, alteration etc.) are considered commercial goods and must be reported in accordance with the requirements outlined in this memorandum for the report of the aircraft; and where the aircraft is also cargo, in accordance with the cargo reporting requirements outlined in this memorandum.

227. In order to facilitate the processing of aircraft temporarily imported into Canada, it is recommended that carriers or pilots contact the Airport of Entry (AOE) at least two hours prior to their estimated time of arrival to provide the CBSA with pertinent flight information. Some airports may be equipped to receive this information by fax. For further information, please contact the CBSA at the airport of destination.

228. Upon arrival all aircraft that are imported temporarily must be reported on an acceptable cargo control document, as outlined in this memorandum.

Re-manifests

229. When an international air waybill or ACI electronic report ends at a point short of destination and the goods are transferred for shipping in bond, the goods must be re-manifested as outlined in Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods. The air carrier transferring the goods provides the secondary shipper with two copies (Long Room and CBSA Delivery Authority) of the cargo control document that clearly shows the goods are “In Bond.” If the initial air carrier will be moving the goods beyond the point of destination indicated on the air waybill or electronic ACI report; a cargo control document must be completed for this secondary movement and the cargo control document must clearly show that the goods are “In bond”.

230. All copies of the cargo control document (IATA format air waybill) used to move in bond goods that have entered the carrier’s system in Canada by a highway, marine, rail, or freight forwarder for shipping to a further destination must have the words “In Bond” typed or clearly stamped in lettering not smaller than 1.2 cm (1/2 inch) in height. The documents are to be processed according to re-manifest procedures outlined in Memorandum D3-1-1, Policy Respecting the Importation and Transportation of Goods. When in bond goods are received from a freight forwarder for shipping to destination, the goods may move under the freight forwarder’s cargo control document and responsibility. In this case, the air waybill must not be presented to the CBSA, as this creates duplicate manifests within the CBSA inventory system. The air waybill should be marked “Cargo covered by the freight forwarder’s cargo control document. Do not manifest or report to the CBSA.” The freight forwarder’s document serves as notice of arrival to the importer or consignee. For further information concerning freight forwarder procedures, refer to Memorandum D3-3-1, Forwarded and Consolidated Cargo – Import Movements.

Delivery Requirements and Transfers to Sufferance Warehouses

231. Cargo arriving by air should be reported to a type AA or AH air sufferance warehouse.

232. Cargo may be transferred to another airline’s sufferance warehouse when the cargo is for shipping by air to another CBSA office or for export.

233. Cargo may be transferred to a type CW air sufferance warehouse on either the original air cargo control document or on freight forwarders house bills, provided the warehouse is licensed to receive the freight and the CBSA has given the carrier authorization to move the goods. In both cases, the cargo control document must show the location of the cargo.

234. Cargo arriving by highway, rail, or marine service may be delivered directly to the airport provided:

  • (a) the cargo is to be shipped by air from the airport under an air cargo control document; or
  • (b) the cargo is to be exported by air from the airport under an air cargo control document where the cargo is to be delivered to a type AA, AH, or CW air sufferance warehouse that is licensed to receive the freight.

Post Arrival Changes

235. Clients have up to 30 days after the aircraft’s arrival to transmit electronic changes to pre-arrival cargo, split shipment reports. There will be a limited number of exceptions in which clients will be required to submit paper post-arrival changes, to local CBSA offices in lieu of electronic changes.

236. These exceptions are limited to the following circumstances not otherwise accommodated by the system:

  • (a) contingency situations where clients are unable to transmit electronically and in advance (for additional information on contingency procedures for system outages, please see paragraph 244 and 245 of this memorandum); and
  • (b) exceptional circumstances, as determined by the CBSA, in which a client is unable to make the post arrival changes electronically.

237. In the Yukon, Northwest Territories, and Nunavut (north of the 60° parallel), where CBSA procedures are enforced by a party other than the CBSA, i.e. RCMP officers or employees of a Canadian government organization, the Form AG1, General Declaration (Outward/Inward) will be required for all flights in addition to any electronic notification that is required pre-arrival.

238. Key data elements pertaining to cargo, and split shipment reports can be electronically corrected or deleted within 30 days post arrival. If corrections/deletions are required after 30 days, the Form BSF673, House Bill, Cargo and Conveyance Manual Correction Form Post Arrival – All Modes must be completed and presented in person (in duplicate), in person to the CBSA, Ambassador Bridge Commercial Operations, 4285 Industrial Drive, Windsor, Ontario, N9C 3R9, by e-mail at cbsa-asfc_sor_windsor_emanifest@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca or by fax to 519-967-4206, only if the required corrections/deletions can no longer be made electronically post arrival.

239. Corrections/deletions to pre-arrival Conveyance reports will only be accepted electronically up to the ETA transmitted on the Conveyance report. If corrections/deletions are required post ETA, the Form BSF673, House Bill, Cargo and Conveyance Manual Correction Form Post Arrival – All Modes must be completed and presented in person (in duplicate) to any CBSA Commercial office open for business, only if the required corrections/deletions can no longer be made electronically post arrival.

Note: Carriers/freight forwarders have up to 90 days to present the correction request to CBSA. Copies of this form can be found on the CBSA Web site.

Contingency Plan in the Event of System Failure

240. In the event of a CBSA system outage, all efforts will be made to continue normal communications, and restore systems to normal operating condition as soon as is reasonably possible.

241. Clients must retain the ability to produce hard copy cargo/conveyance declarations in the event of disruption to CBSA systems.

Penalty Information

242. For information on administrative penalties, refer to Memorandum D22-1-1, Administrative Monetary Penalty System. Information on AMPS penalties is also available on the AMPS Web page.

243. Other administrative sanctions, such as the revocation of program privileges and penalties of other government departments, may also be applicable.

244. In some situations, failure to comply with the CBSA requirements outlined in the Customs Act, may result in the seizure and forfeiture of the goods and/or conveyance, and – in serious cases – criminal charges may be applicable.

Additional Information

245. For more information, within Canada call the Border Information Service at 1-800-461-9999. From outside Canada call 204-983-3500 or 506-636-5064. Long distance charges will apply. Agents are available Monday to Friday (08:00 – 16:00 local time / except holidays). TTY is also available within Canada: 1-866-335-3237.


Appendix A

Instructions for Completing the IATA Air Waybill

The following fields must be completed for CBSA use:

1. Airport of Departure

Indicate the IATA three-letter code of the airport of departure (or city when the airport is unknown).

2. Cargo Control Number

This number includes the carrier code and the cargo control number assigned from the carrier’s air waybill series. A CBSA assigned carrier code is made up of four characters (one alpha, two digits, and a hyphen) or will be the same as the carrier’s IATA prefix code if the CBSA was able to match the IATA accounting code when the CBSA carrier code was assigned. This cargo control number cannot be duplicated for a one-year period.

3. Shipper’s Name and Address

Indicate the complete name and address of the person or company shipping the goods.

4. Consignee’s Name and Address

Indicate the complete name and address of the person or company importing the goods.

5. Handling Information

For transborder air shipments entering Canada in the service of a highway carrier, indicate in the “Handling Information” field the U.S. point of exit, that is, the U.S. point at which, or nearest to which the land-surface carrier transporting the goods crosses the border of the U.S. into Canada.

6. Number of Pieces

Indicate the quantity of goods being imported. If a number of goods are being reported, the number of packages must be totalled. In the case of bulk loads, e.g., unpackaged meat or bolts, one unit load device (ULD) is acceptable as a piece count.

7. Gross Weight

Indicate the weight of the shipment in pounds or kilograms. Weight must be totalled.

8. Nature and Quantity of Goods (including dimensions or volume)

Give an accurate, concise description of the goods in common trade terms, and note any marks imprinted on the packages or goods. When goods are consigned to a freight forwarder, “freight of all kinds” or “general merchandise” may be inserted in this field.

Notes:
All copies must be clearly stamped “In Bond” in lettering not smaller than 1.2 cm (½ inch) in height by the transferring carrier or freight forwarder.

When goods are consigned to a freight forwarder, the full details of each shipment (shipper, consignee, nature and quantity of goods) must be included on an attached list.

Appendix B

Instructions for Completing the IATA Air Express Waybill

1. Cargo Control Number

This number consists of the CBSA assigned carrier code and the cargo control number assigned from the carrier’s air waybill series. This cargo control number cannot be duplicated for a one-year period.

2. Shipper’s Account Number

This field for use by the shipper is optional.

3. From Shipper (Name)

Indicate the complete name and address of the person or company shipping the goods.

4. Consignee Account Number

This field for use by the carrier is optional.

5. To Consignee/Name/Company/Address

Indicate the complete name and address of the person or company importing the goods.

6. Location of Type of Service

In this box, the carrier may indicate the type of service and brand name or commercial description of the express products offered, and from which the shipper may select.

7. Handling Information

For transborder air shipments entering Canada in the service of a highway carrier, indicate in the “Special Handling” field the U.S. point of exit, that is, the U.S. point at which, or nearest to which the land surface carrier transporting the goods crosses the border of the U.S. into Canada.

8. Number of Pieces

Indicate the quantity of goods being imported. If a number of goods are being reported, the number of packages must be totalled.

9. Gross Weight

Indicate the weight of the shipment in pounds or kilograms. Weight must be totalled.

10. Full and Complete Description of Contents (including dimensions or volume)

Give an accurate, concise description of the goods in common trade terms, and note any marks imprinted on the packages or goods.

Appendix C

Calculation of Security in the Air Mode

1.   The classes of aircraft outlined in this memorandum reflect those specified in Section 2 of the Air Transportation Regulations. Although these classes only apply to aircraft operated by Canadian entities under the licence issued to them by the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA), for CBSA security calculation purposes the classes apply to both Canadian and non-Canadian aircraft.

Passenger Aircraft

2.   Passenger aircraft are categorized as “small, medium or large” as defined in the Air Transportation Regulations and based on the certified maximum passenger carrying capacity for that type and model of aircraft.

3.   As defined in the Air Transportation Regulations:

“small aircraft” means an aircraft equipped for the carriage of passengers and having a certificated maximum carrying capacity of not more than 39 passengers;

“medium aircraft” means an aircraft equipped for the carriage of passengers and having a certificated maximum carrying capacity of more than 39 passengers but not more than 89 passengers; and,

“large aircraft” means an aircraft equipped for the carriage of passengers and having a certificated maximum carrying capacity of more than 89 passengers.

All-cargo Aircraft

4.   Aircraft equipped for “all-cargo” operations will, for the purpose of calculating security requirements as specified in this Memorandum, be categorized according to the aircraft’s maximum certified take off weight (MCTOW). An aircraft with an MCTOW of 75,000 lbs. or less will be considered as being a “small or medium aircraft” and will be subject to a $10,000 per aircraft minimum (maximum $80,000 per fleet); whereas, an aircraft with an MCTOW of more than 75,000 lbs. will be considered as a “large aircraft” and will be subject to a $20,000 per aircraft minimum (maximum $80,000 per fleet).

5.   As defined in the Air Transportation Regulations, “all-cargo aircraft” means an aircraft that is equipped for the carriage of goods only.

6.   Security required ranges from a minimum of $10,000 per aircraft for small and medium aircraft, and a minimum of $20,000 per aircraft for large aircraft, with a maximum of $80,000 per fleet.

Note: A “fleet” consists of all aircraft owned, operated, or registered to the company, organization, or division indicated on the bond, and is not determined by the number of units intended to be used in the provision of the international service being offered.

7.   For information regarding aircraft classes/groupings, licences and CTA charter flight notification, please contact the Canadian Transportation Agency at the address or telephone numbers listed below. For CTA licensing information, please see the Canadian Transportation Agency’s Web site.

Secretary
Canadian Transportation Agency Ottawa ON K1A 0N9

819-997-6359 (during regular business hours)
613-769-6274 (after regular business hours)

References

Issuing office :
Program and Policy Management Division
Commercial Program Directorate
Programs Branch
Headquarters file :
 
Superseded memorandum D

D3-2-1 dated
D3-2-2 dated
D12-2-1 dated

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