eManifest

Information for All Client Types

The following information is relevant to eManifest. It is important to note that this information may change as eManifest is implemented.

Additions and Repairs to Commercial Vehicles

With the implementation of eManifest, the current method of reporting emergency repairs for all highway carriers, including Customs Self Assessment (CSA) carriers, will continue. Carriers will still present a repair invoice to the Canada Border Service Agency (CBSA) border services officer on arrival at the border, who will then stamp the invoice and return it to the driver to affirm the reporting of the emergency repair. In other modes, the place of report will be the nearest CBSA office.

The reporting of repairs and additions that do not fall under the description of emergency repairs are considered importations. The carrier, or their authorized service provider, is required to transmit advance cargo and conveyance data for all equipment added, or repairs performed, outside of Canada. In addition, carriers will continue to either pay the duties and taxes on the repairs or additions at the time of arrival, or those carriers enrolled in the Summary Accounting of Repairs Program will submit a quarterly report to their local CBSA office.

Return to: Highway Carriers

Administrative Monetary Penalties for Carriers who Voluntarily Report Non-compliance with Pre-Arrival Data Requirements

Under the Advance Commercial Information (ACI) program, the carrier, or their authorized service provider, is required to prepare and transmit to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) the required cargo and conveyance information within mode-specific time frames.

As a general rule, when the CBSA discovers that a client has not complied with their obligations under the law, an Administrative Monetary Penalty System (AMPS) penalty may be applied.

The CBSA's AMPS program was designed to be corrective. As such, the CBSA has decided that in cases when a carrier voluntarily comes forward to correct non-compliance prior to any exam, investigation or audit initiated by the CBSA, an AMPS penalty will not be applied.

However, voluntary disclosure will not apply in cases when a carrier arrives at First Point of Arrival (FPOA) and advises the CBSA that no mandatory data has been transmitted pre-arrival.

It is also important to note that the CBSA is developing a system for eManifest that, when fully implemented, will provide client compliance and program compliance measurement reports. Therefore, carriers who repetitively identify failure to submit all the required pre-arrival information, or have numerous data amendments or deleted transmissions, can have this information form part of their overall risk score.

Return to: Highway Carriers, Rail Carriers, Air Carriers, Marine Carriers

Auto-cancellation of Unused Cargo Control Numbers

Currently, there are multiple time frames for the storage of non-arrived cargo data (i.e. cargo data that is transmitted but not used to report/arrive goods) in the Canada Border Services Agency's (CBSA) Accelerated Commercial Release Operations Support System (ACROSS). Depending on the service option used (e.g. eManifest, Pre-arrival Review System (PARS), Customs Self Assessment (CSA), etc.), non-arrived cargo data may be stored in ACROSS between 30 and 120 days before being either purged from the system or transferred into an historical database.

The CBSA intends to unify the storage period of all non-arrived cargo data, in all modes, to a 90-day time frame such that 90 days after the CBSA receives advance cargo data from clients:

  • ACROSS will automatically cancel all non-arrived cargo data, and
  • the CBSA will notify the originator of the data, along with any trade partners nominated as a secondary notify party (SNP), of the auto-cancellation, enabling the cancelled Cargo Control Numbers (CCNs) to be reused.

Until such time as CBSA systems' upgrades have been scheduled and completed, existing program-specific time frames will apply.

Return to: Highway Carriers, Rail Carriers, Air Carriers, Marine Carriers, Freight Forwarders, Importers

Consolidated-shipment versus single-shipment data transmission requirements

The following information is intended to assist the trade community in differentiating between single shipments and consolidated shipments for Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) purposes, as well as determining who is responsible for transmitting electronic cargo and electronic house bill data to the CBSA.

For CBSA purposes, a shipment is defined as:

A specified good or collection of specified goods that is listed, in a single bill of lading, waybill or other similar document that relates to the carriage of goods, for transport between two or more persons.

When transmitting cargo data to the CBSA for a single shipment (a shipment which is not consolidated), a pre-arrival electronic cargo document is required (or pre-load in the marine mode, depending on the type and origin of the goods). A CBSA-assigned carrier code  must be used when transmitting the cargo document. In addition to other mandatory and conditional data elements required in the electronic cargo document, carriers must transmit:

  • Shipper name and address
  • Consignee name and address
  • Detailed description of goods
  • Weight and pieces

The cargo data used to create the cargo document is based on the information contained in the carrier's through bill of lading or ocean bill of lading, supported by documentation found in the carrier's books and records. A single bill of lading represents one shipment, but may incorporate information from multiple invoices and therefore may include multiple descriptions. However, a bill of lading will only have one shipper and one consignee. The CBSA will review shipping documentation, including the bill of lading and the source documents (i.e. billing and payment records), used by the carrier to create the bill of lading in order to verify the cargo data transmitted to the CBSA was true, accurate and complete.

For CBSA purposes, a consolidated shipment is defined as:

A number of separate shipments grouped together by a consolidator or freight forwarder and shipped to an agent or a freight forwarder as one shipment, under one bill of lading, and reported to Customs on one cargo control document.
(one shipper and one consignee)

When transmitting cargo data for a consolidated shipment, a pre-arrival electronic cargo document (or preload in the marine mode, depending on the type and origin of the goods)and pre-arrival electronic house bill documents (or pre-load in the marine mode, depending on the type and origin of the goods) are required. (Supplementary data transmissions will continue to be required for consolidated Freight Remaining On Board (FROB) shipments in the air and marine modes).

Carriers will transmit the electronic cargo document providing the cargo details as they appear on their through bill of lading or ocean bill of lading. The data elements included in the cargo document include, but are not limited to:

  • Shipper name and address (foreign freight forwarder or consolidator name and address)
  • Consignee name and address (Canadian freight forwarder or consolidator name and address)
  • General description of goods (i.e. freight of all kinds, consolidated freight, or description of goods as it appears on the bill of lading)
  • Weight and pieces

In addition to the required data elements, when transmitting data on a consolidated shipment, carriers must select "Y" for the 'consolidated indicator' (on their cargo document) to identify to the CBSA that the shipment is consolidated and that house bill data are expected.

The freight forwarder or consolidator will transmit additional cargo details of consolidated shipments in the electronic house bill document (or supplementary transmission for FROB in the air and marine modes), to which the carrier typically would not have access. The data elements included in the house bill document include, but are not limited to:

  • Shipper name and address
  • Consignee name and address
  • Detailed description of goods
  • Weight and pieces

To transmit house bill data, the freight forwarder or consolidator must have a CBSA-assigned carrier code.

The implementation of eManifest does not change business-to-business relationships between trade partners. eManifest requires specific data from specific trade partners prior to the arrival of shipments in Canada so that the CBSA can obtain all the information necessary to perform an accurate risk assessment of goods destined to Canada. Importers, carriers and freight forwarders should use the guidelines above as well as CBSA-published documents (i.e. Departmental Memoranda and the Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document) to determine which trade partner is responsible for transmitting the specific data elements required for a specific shipment.

Return to: Highway Carriers, Rail Carriers, Air Carriers, Marine Carriers, Freight Forwarders, Importers

Conveyance Movement with Disabled Tractor Attached

If a conveyance (bobtail) is towing back to Canada a disabled tractor and no goods are being imported, the conveyance movement does not qualify for the "bobtail" exemption to eManifest requirements. The carrier is required to transmit empty conveyance data to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) within the prescribed time frame because the conveyance would no longer be considered a bobtail when there is another conveyance attached.

Note:  The CBSA system will accept carriers entering the tractor plate of the working tractor as the "tractor license plate" and the tractor plate of the disabled tractor being towed as the "trailer license plate" for this type of movement. When the conveyance arrives at the Primary Inspection Line (PIL), the border services officer will use discretion and may ask further questions about the disabled tractor if required.

Return to: Highway Carriers

Documenting Proof of Report for Highway Frontier Release(s)

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) will provide highway carriers with proof of report at First Point of Arrival (FPOA) for frontier release(s) and in the event of a system outage when eManifest is implemented.

When the carrier and shipment arrive at the border (FPOA), the following procedures apply:

  • The driver will present a lead sheet to the CBSA border services officer (BSO) that contains:
    • a bar-coded Conveyance Reference Number (CRN), or
    • a bar-coded Cargo Control Number (CCN) with a handwritten CRN, or
    • handwritten CRN if an alternate bar-coded document is also being presented with the lead sheet (e.g. Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS) document with a bar-coded PARS number).
  • The driver and any passenger(s) will present their personal identification.
  • The BSO will review the pre-arrival recommendation and decide to authorize passage or to refer for primary or secondary processing.
  • The BSO will stamp the lead sheet as proof of report and return it to the driver.
  • System-generated notification messages will be sent to trade chain participants, indicating whether the goods have been released or referred.

It is important to note that:

  • In the event of any unforeseen system outage, the carrier may use the stamped lead sheet as proof of report to the CBSA.
  • It is the carrier's responsibility to keep the stamped lead sheet, as the CBSA will not collect this lead sheet.
  • Normal stamping of PARS / importer entries will continue as they do today.

Return to: Highway Carriers

Dolly Equipment

Dolly equipment (as shown in, or similar to, the picture below) is exempt from any pre-arrival data requirements under eManifest provided the dolly is being used in the international transportation of goods, i.e. it is not being imported into Canada for the first time.

Note: If the dolly is purchased outside of Canada and is being imported into Canada for the first time, the goods would need to be imported as per eManifest pre-arrival data requirements and applicable duties and taxes should be paid by the importer.

Dolly

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) has taken into account the following bobtail exemption as defined in the Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document (ECCRD), Chapter 4: ACI/eManifest Highway and Chapter 7: ACI/eManifest Highway Portal:

Bobtails

  • (i) i.e. tractor with no trailer or semi-trailer. Excludes tractor-trailers or any other 'complete' truck, e.g. cube vans. The bobtail highway conveyance must:
    • be without any equipment attached (for example a trailer, chassis, etc.)
    • be without any commercial goods; and
    • not be being imported.

For the purposes of the above bobtail definition, a dolly or device used to link trailers is not considered to be a trailer, chassis or semi-trailer. This would allow for those scenarios where a dolly will be entering or returning to Canada and is attached to a cab with no trailer attached; therefore qualifying for the bobtail exemption.

Return to: Highway Carriers

eManifest Processing of Highway Carrier Conveyance Data (Conveyance Reference Number) at the First Point of Arrival

Under eManifest, the carrier who is "the owner or person in charge of the conveyance", or their authorized agent/service provider, is required to transmit to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) the advance conveyance information specified in the Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document (ECCRD), Chapter 4: ACI/eManifest Highway or Chapter 7: ACI/eManifest Highway Portal.

The first four digits of the Conveyance Reference Number (CRN) must be the carrier code representing the carrier that is physically transporting the goods to Canada and reporting the goods at the First Point of Arrival (FPOA). This carrier has the statutory obligation under section 12.1 of the Customs Act to provide advance information to the CBSA and the statutory obligation under section 12. (1) of the Customs Act to report the goods. These statutory obligations cannot be shifted from one carrier to another. The carrier code of the carrier transporting the goods must always be represented in the CRN, regardless of which party transmitted the related cargo data. A carrier arriving at FPOA using another carrier's code in their CRN is not acceptable.

Failure to provide the accurate CRN may result in delays in processing.

Return to: Highway Carriers

Exceptional Clearances – Interim Highway Process

Until such time as an electronic process for transmitting exceptional clearance data is made available, an interim process for these shipments will apply. Exceptional clearances include form E29B – Temporary Admission Permit, A.T.A. Carnet, Orders in Council, and personal goods arriving by commercial highway carriers (e.g. settlers' effects).

Specifically, the following interim process for exceptional clearances will apply:

  • Carriers will transmit the electronic cargo and conveyance data as outlined in the Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document (ECCRD), Chapter 4: ACI/eManifest Highway or Chapter 7: ACI/eManifest Highway Portal.
  • At First Point of Arrival (FPOA), the driver and any passenger(s) will provide the required personal identification.
  • At the Primary Inspection Line (PIL), the driver will provide:
    • a lead sheet that contains: a bar-coded Conveyance Reference Number (CRN); or a bar-coded Cargo Control Number (CCN) with a handwritten CRN; or a handwritten CRN if an alternate bar-coded document is also being presented with the lead sheet (e.g. a Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS) document with a bar-coded PARS number), and
    • a paper A8A (also known as a Cargo Control Document) with a bar-coded or handwritten CCN for all cargo requiring exceptional clearances.
  • The PIL officer will refer the cargo for primary processing.
  • The driver will present the paper A8A and other documentation related to the clearance. (The carrier may need to obtain the paperwork from the broker as the carrier will not always have the documentation on hand.)
  • The clearance will be processed as it is processed today.

Under eManifest, the CBSA will only accept shipment information that is submitted electronically unless there is an exception or exemption as defined in the applicable chapters of the ECCRD.

In addition, the existing penalty for not having the CCN in a bar-coded format will not be applied in instances when a carrier must hand write the electronically transmitted CCN onto the A8A being used to move any of these exceptional clearances in-bond during the interim period. The splitting of A8A copies will continue as per existing procedure (copies shared by the port of entry, the reporting carrier and the inland warehouse operator).

Return to: Highway Carriers

Examination at First Point of Arrival

The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) will not mandate all examinations at the First Point of Arrival (FPOA). This means that shipments deemed to be low risk may be examined at the first point of operational intervention (e.g. at an inland CBSA office or approved inland destination).

While FPOA examination of all shipments is not mandated, the CBSA will not relinquish its legislative authority to examine any goods at the FPOA. As a general policy, shipments identified as being high risk in terms of national security, national public safety and contraband, and shipments of unknown risk will be examined at the FPOA.

Return to: Highway Carriers, Rail Carriers, Air Carriers, Marine Carriers, Freight Forwarders, Importers

Flying Trucks: Intermodal (Air to Highway) Movement of Goods

Goods may travel by more than one mode on their journey to Canada. When goods are first transported by air and controlled by air documentation (i.e. air waybill), then changed to truck transport and arrive at the border in highway mode, the conveyance is commonly referred to as a "flying truck."

Flying trucks are currently exempt from the requirement to transmit pre-arrival cargo data via ACI/eManifest, as documented in paragraph 131 of the CBSA D-Memorandum D3-2-1. This exemption will remain in place until regulatory amendments are finalized as part of the eManifest initiative. Highway carriers are, however, required to transmit highway pre-arrival conveyance data electronically to the CBSA for the flying truck identifying the exempt cargo.  Please refer to the Exemptions (cargo and conveyance) section of the ECCRD Chapter 4: Advance Commercial Information (ACI)/eManifest Highway.

Some freight forwarders are also exempt from certain reporting requirements for consolidated air cargo transported in the highway mode. For more information on procedures for transporting air cargo into Canada via highway mode, refer to D-Memorandum D3-2-1.

In the future, the highway conveyance operator will be required to provide pre-arrival cargo data for flying truck cargo. At that point in time, the highway conveyance operator will also be required to transmit house bill data (if applicable) for consolidated flying truck cargo. The CBSA will provide notice to stakeholders prior to lifting this exemption.

More information on how to transmit ACI data can be found in the Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document (ECCRD), Chapter 4: ACI/eManifest Highway or Chapter 7: ACI/ eManifest Highway Portal.

For more information, contact the Advance Commercial Information Policy Unit at aci-ipec@cbsa-asfc.gc.ca

Return to: Highway Carriers, Air Carriers

Guidelines for Post-arrival Manual Corrections for House Bill, Cargo and Conveyance Information (eManifest)

On , Customs Notice 16-08 was issued to inform warehouse operators, freight forwarders, carriers, and their service providers who transact business electronically with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) that Form BSF673 used to request post-arrival amendments to key data elements as well as guidelines have been updated.

Effective immediately, if cargo and/or conveyance arrival messages were sent in error prior to the actual arrival, warehouse operators, freight forwarders, carriers, and/or their service providers will be required to present a completed Form BSF673.

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Hand-carried Goods

Hand-carried goods are exempt from eManifest advance cargo and conveyance data requirements.

Goods that will be released after they have been accounted for and all duties with respect to them have been paid under subsection 32(1) of the Act if:

  • (a) the goods are or will be in the actual possession of a person arriving in Canada, or
  • (b) the goods form or will form part of a person's baggage and the person and the baggage arrive or will arrive in Canada on board the same conveyance.

This exemption will continue when eManifest advance trade data requirements for importers are implemented at a later date.

Return to: Highway Carriers, Rail Carriers, Air Carriers, Marine Carriers, Importers

In-bond Movement of Goods (end-state electronic process)

Currently, carriers and freight forwarders who have filed security with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) are permitted to transport in-bond goods between points in Canada (e.g. to an inland destination for examination and/or release).

The CBSA recognizes the benefit to the trade community of allowing in-bond movement of goods and the significant challenge it would pose to not allow this. Therefore, with the implementation of eManifest, shipments will continue to be granted in-bond movement as long as all required pre-arrival data is provided within prescribed time frames.

Upon further examination and following feedback from the trade community, the CBSA is developing a revised border process for situations when the submission of advance trade data from importers in the highway mode becomes mandatory.

If the CBSA has received and risk assessed the carrier's pre-arrival cargo and conveyance data but has not received advance trade data from importers prior to arrival, the shipment will be risk assessed at First Point of Arrival (FPOA); and

  • If the carrier and driver are not members of a CBSA trusted trader program, the shipment will not be eligible to move in-bond until the importer data is provided and risk assessed.
  • If the carrier and driver are approved members of CBSA trusted trader programs, the shipment will be allowed to move in-bond to an approved warehouse.

Trusted trader programs include Customs Self-Assessment / Free and Secure Trade (CSA/FAST), bonded Partners in Protection (PIP) and Commercial Driver Registration Program (CDRP).

This process provides tangible benefits to carriers who have invested in these programs. It also recognizes that the majority of highway shipments already provide pre-arrival information and a large number of importers currently use such service options.

Return to: Highway Carriers, Freight Forwarders, Importers

Instruments of International Trade (IIT) – Highway and Rail Modes

Instruments of International Trade (IIT), also known as Ottawa file and Container Banks, are listed as an "exception" to the transmission of advance cargo data in the mode-specific chapters of the Electronic Commerce Client Requirements Document (ECCRD) for highway and rail carriers. Advance conveyance data is required, as is cargo data for non-excepted cargo.

Ottawa file and Container Banks are empty shipper or importer-owned containers and also those registered under Ottawa file or with container bank numbers, which are used to transport commercial goods to and from Canada. Although carriers are familiar with such equipment, the determination of whether a good qualifies as an IIT and the classification of IITs are the responsibility of the importer/broker, and must be reported and accounted for at the time of arrival in Canada and in accordance with existing requirements.

In addition to including the IIT indicator in the Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) conveyance map or eManifest Portal field, the carrier is required to verbally report the IIT to the Canada Border Services Agency officer at the time of arrival. The carrier may choose to present a paper A8A Cargo Control Document for those goods.

Carriers should use the following general descriptions of qualified IITs entering Canada, empty, on a commercial conveyance, to determine whether an IIT indicator is required when transmitting advance conveyance data:

  • shipping tanks
  • pallets
  • baskets
  • bins
  • boxes
  • cartons
  • crates
  • gaylords (skid boxes)
  • load locks/spacers
  • racks
  • trays
  • totes, or
  • similar goods used to ship goods internationally.

Return to: Highway Carriers, Rail Carriers, Importers

Interim Highway Process for In-bond Shipments

Prior to eManifest regulations coming into force, an interim period will exist when highway carriers will continue to present paper manifests for shipments not reported electronically or for all in-bond movements.

In the case of shipments moving in-bond to a CBSA-approved warehouse, a paper A8A (also known as a Cargo Control Document/CCD) will be required to control and record the movement of in-bond goods until such time as inland warehouse operators are able to participate in the electronic eManifest system.

During the interim period, and until the eManifest system completely supports electronic processing of in-bond movements, the following requirements will apply to the in-bond movement of goods:

  • Upon arrival at the border, the driver will continue to present a CCD (form A8A) for each in-bond cargo, even if the carrier has transmitted electronic cargo and conveyance data.
  • A Cargo Control Number (CCN) will be mandatory on each A8A, but will not be required in a bar-coded format.
  • Carriers are strongly encouraged to link the electronically transmitted data to a pre-printed paper A8A using the CCN, if their system allows them to do so.

In addition, the splitting of A8A copies will continue as per existing procedure (copies shared by the port of entry, the reporting carrier and the inland warehouse operator). The existing penalty for not having the CCN in a bar-coded format will not be applied in instances when a carrier must hand write the electronically transmitted CCN onto the A8A being used to control the in-bond movement during the interim period.

Return to: Highway Carriers

Licence Plate and Equipment Identification Numbers

Tractor and trailer licence plate numbers are required data elements that highway carriers must transmit electronically to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) prior to arrival at the border.

In cases where trailers are exempt from provincial registration requirements, the CBSA will permit the 17-character Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) to be transmitted in the "Equipment Identification Number" field (EDI transmissions) or the "Trailer Identifier" field (eManifest Portal transmissions) and accept the transmission of "zeroes" in the "Trailer Plate" field.

This requirement harmonizes with existing U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) policies that allow for the trailer licence plate number or the VIN.

Return to: Highway Carriers

Mixed CSA Shipments in Highway Mode

The current policy for processing Customs Self Assessment (CSA) carriers' mixed loads of CSA-eligible and non-CSA-eligible goods in the regular commercial lane is as follows:

Goods being reported in the regular commercial lanes in the case of a mixed load (CSA and non-CSA) have the choice of including the CSA cargo in the advance electronic cargo and conveyance data transmission or only transmitting the advance data for the non-CSA cargo in addition to presenting the three (3) CSA bar codes for the CSA goods (SO497).

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Presenting eManifest Lead Sheets on Arrival at the Border

There are three options available to carriers and their drivers when presenting documents to the CBSA officer upon arrival at the Primary Inspection Line (PIL):

  1. (Preferred option) Present a lead sheet that contains, at a minimum, a bar-coded Conveyance Reference Number (CRN), or
  2. Present a lead sheet that contains, at a minimum, a bar-coded Cargo Control Number (CCN) with a handwritten CRN, or
  3. Present a lead sheet that contains, at a minimum, a handwritten CRN and also present Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS) document(s) with a bar-coded PARS number.

Each option requires that a document with a machine-readable bar code be presented to the CBSA officer. When scanned, this code will link to the advance cargo and conveyance data transmitted by the carrier.

In the event that an alternate release request is being used, i.e. Release on Minimum Documentation (RMD) and a bar-coded CCN is not available prior to arrival, then the CRN on the lead sheet that the driver presents to the CBSA officer must be in bar-coded format.

Clients submitting their advance data through the eManifest Portal have the option of printing a lead sheet that includes a bar-coded CRN.

Option 1 eManifest lead sheet example:

The following example of an eManifest lead sheet shows a boxed area for the CBSA officer's stamp of 'proof of report', a bar-coded CRN, the CRN written out in numbers and letters, and the CCNs associated with the shipment written out in numbers and letters. Note that the minimum requirement for option 1 is for the lead sheet to contain the bar-coded CRN. All other information in this example would be optional and based on the carriers' administrative needs.

Option 1 eManifest lead sheet example

Option 2 eManifest lead sheet example:

The following example of an eManifest lead sheet shows a bar-coded CCN, the CCN written out in numbers and letters, and the handwritten CRN in numbers and letters. Note that the minimum requirement for option 2 is for the lead sheet to contain the bar-coded CCN and handwritten CRN.

Option 2 eManifest lead sheet example

Option 3 eManifest lead sheet example:

The following examples show an eManifest lead sheet with a handwritten CRN and a bar-coded PARS document (indicating that a shipment of 596 boxes of boneless pork loin chops is being transported from XYZ Packing of Chicago, Illinois, to ABC Grocery in Toronto, Ontario. Note that the two documents together would meet the minimum requirements for option 3.

Option 3 eManifest lead sheet example Option 3 eManifest lead sheet example 2

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Release at First Point of Arrival

Recognizing the business implications for the trade community and the paper processes due to other government departments' requirements, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) will not mandate release at the First Point of Arrival (FPOA).

The CBSA will continue to encourage importers/brokers to voluntarily provide advance trade data for release (i.e. Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS) or similar service option).

Return to: Highway Carriers, Rail Carriers, Air Carriers, Marine Carriers, Freight Forwarders, Importers

Single-trip In-bond Highway Movements

Currently, a non-bonded carrier may post a single-trip bond at First Point of Arrival (FPOA) to allow for the movement of unreleased goods to an approved inland destination. A single-trip authorization may be acquired by filing security with the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) using cash or a certified cheque, or by engaging a customs broker who provides this service.

Goods moving in-bond on a single-trip authorization are linked to a carrier code, bond authorization number and cargo control number (CCN), printed on a Cargo Control Document (CCD). This paper process allows for the reporting, tracing and acquittal of each shipment.

Since it is expected that the single-trip in-bond process will be in limited and declining use, this process will remain paper-based under eManifest, with the exception of the mandatory transmission of advance trade data from importers at a later date.

Specifically, the following process will apply to single-trip in-bond movement of goods:

  • Highway carriers will transmit cargo and conveyance data as a frontier release prior to arrival.
  • At the Primary Inspection Line (PIL), the driver will declare that a single-trip authorization is required to move inland and provide a lead sheet that contains:
    • a bar-coded Conveyance Reference Number (CRN), or
    • a bar-coded Cargo Control Number (CCN) and a handwritten CRN, or
    • handwritten CRN if an alternate bar-coded document is also being presented with the lead sheet (e.g. a Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS) document with a bar-coded PARS number).
  • The PIL officer will refer the driver for primary processing to apply for the single-trip bond.
  • The driver will present a completed paper re-manifest (A8A) to move to the inland warehouse. (The carrier may need to obtain the paperwork from the broker as the carrier will not always have the documentation on hand.)
  • The clearance will be processed as in-bond movements are processed today.

In addition, the splitting of A8A copies will continue as is done today (copies shared by the port of entry, the reporting carrier and the inland warehouse operator). The existing penalty for not having a CCN in bar-coded format will not be applied in those instances when a carrier must handwrite the CCN onto the A8A being used to control the re-manifested, single-trip in-bond movement.

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Stamping: Highway Carrier Documents to be Presented and Stamped at the Border as Proof of Report and/or Release of Commercial Shipments

Using the eManifest process, when a highway carrier and shipment arrive at the border, the driver is required to present a lead sheet to the CBSA officer at the Primary Inspection Line (PIL) (see Presenting eManifest Highway Bar Codes on Arrival at the Border). This will clearly identify to the CBSA officer that it is an eManifest shipment and scanning of the bar code will automatically display the information for the cargo and conveyance on the officer's computer screen.

If, however, the lead sheet does not have a bar code and the carrier is requesting release using the Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS), the driver should provide the lead sheet and one PARS invoice to the CBSA officer. The driver should advise the officer that the bar code is on the PARS document.

When using the eManifest process, the CBSA officer is not required to manually retrieve and clear each individual PARS associated with a conveyance. The CBSA's Accelerated Commercial Release Operations Support System (ACROSS) has been designed to automatically send the release request linked to a conveyance into release status when the conditions for release have been met and the conveyance and subsequent cargos have arrived. This is a great benefit to carriers as it will eliminate the opportunity for errors when clearing multiple shipments.

Carriers are encouraged to take full advantage of the Release Notification System (RNS), which will provide a message when the release has been completed, and can be considered proof of release. This message, in combination with a stamped eManifest lead sheet which constitutes proof of report, completes the clearance process, thereby making the need to obtain and keep additional copies of stamped PARS release documents unnecessary. It will also allow for more efficient processing times at the PIL.

If carriers wish to continue to receive stamped copies of individual releases at the time of clearance until they are satisfied that their systems are operating properly (and they have everything they need with the lead sheet and system messages), they should instruct their drivers to request that the CBSA officer stamps these copies at the PIL. CBSA officers have been instructed to accommodate these requests during the interim period.

Return to: Highway Carriers, Importers

Third-party Transmission of an Importer Advance Trade Data Exception Indicator

Under eManifest, carriers are required to provide the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) with advance cargo and conveyance data, freight forwarders will be required to provide advance house bill / supplementary cargo data, and importers will be required to provide importer advance trade data (ATD). However, in certain circumstances, exceptions to these requirements will apply and the transmission of the appropriate exception code is required.

When importer data requirements are implemented and there is an exception to providing importer ATD, a carrier or freight forwarder can transmit the ATD exception code on the importer's behalf if:

  • the carrier / freight forwarder has been authorized by the importer to do so (e.g. via e-mail or a carriage contract), and
  • the carrier / freight forwarder also transmits the Manifest Forward recipient client identifier of the importer/agent. The identifier must be a valid importer business number.

Note: In the event of non-compliance with eManifest requirements, the CBSA will require proof of instruction from the carrier or freight forwarder by the importer to transmit an ATD exception code in order to determine against which party an Administrative Monetary Penalty System (AMPS) should be assessed. Failure to provide proof of instruction by the importer will result in an AMPS penalty being assessed against the carrier or freight forwarder. If proof of instruction is provided, the AMPS penalty will be assessed against the importer.

Return to: Highway Carriers, Rail Carriers, Air Carriers, Marine Carriers, Freight Forwarders, Importers

Transmitting Accurate eManifest Highway Cargo Data

Highway carriers will experience delays at the border when the bar codes presented by the driver on arrival for shipments — either the bar-coded Cargo Control Number (CCN) or the bar-coded Pre-Arrival Review System (PARS) number — do not match the CCN transmitted in advance to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA). Inaccurate CCN transmission by carriers could also result in sanctions for non-compliance including the issuing of penalties under the Administrative Monetary Penalty System (AMPS).

It is particularly important that carriers presenting bar-coded PARS numbers on arrival ensure that the electronically transmitted CCN is identical to the PARS number used on arrival at the border, inclusive of the acronym "PARS", where applied.

The CBSA recommends that carriers either:

  • provide the driver with a bar-coded PARS number specific to each shipment so that the carrier knows which PARS number is being used and will also use the same number when transmitting their eManifest cargo data to the CBSA prior to arrival, or
  • the driver will contact the carrier as soon as a PARS number is used for a shipment (similar to how they notify the broker today), and the carrier will then know which number to electronically transmit to the CBSA.

For example, if the bar-coded PARS number that the driver provides at the border for a shipment is "1234PARS56789", then the CCN that the carrier electronically transmits prior to arrival must also be "1234PARS56789". It is not a requirement to embed the letters "PARS" into a PARS number, but if a carrier does embed letters into the PARS number the driver provides at the border, then the carrier must use the identical number in their eManifest electronic cargo transmission.

Clients are also reminded to pay particular attention when using the letters "I" and "O" and the numbers "1" and "0" in their CCNs or PARS numbers.  They must use the same letters/numbers when quoting the CCN in both the pre-arrival eManifest transmission and in arranging for the broker's release documents.

Return to: Highway Carriers

Clarification of Terms

Primary Inspection Line (PIL) – describes a workstation where a driver and the CBSA border services officer (BSO) first interact.

Primary Processing– describes a workstation where the PIL BSO may direct a driver if additional commercial processing is required. This is sometimes referred to as the "front counter" or "commercial counter".

Secondary Processing – describes a workstation where the BSO may direct a driver after the PIL or Primary Processing and where examinations are conducted.

Additional definitions can be found in the CBSA Glossary.

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