Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy 2017-2020
Canada Border Services Agency

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Table of contents

Introduction

The 2017-2020 Departmental Plan consolidates and replaces all the components of the Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy (DSDS) that were formerly presented in the tabled Report on Plans and Priorities and on departmental websites. This plan also integrates reporting on Strategic Environmental Assessments, pursuant to the Guidelines for Implementing the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals.

By consolidating this information, the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) has clearly described their contributions toward the achievement of the goals and targets of the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS). The CBSA DSDS supports the commitment to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament and contributes to an integrated whole-of-government view of activities supporting environmental sustainability.

Section 1 – Overview of the federal government's approach to sustainable development

The 2016–20 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy (FSDS) presents the Government of Canada's sustainable development activities, as required by the Federal Sustainable Development Act. In keeping with the objectives of the Act to make environmental decision making more transparent and accountable to Parliament, the Canada Border Services Agency supports the implementation of the FSDS through the activities in this CBSA DSDS.

This Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy presents the planned contributions and expected results for:

Section 2 - Agency Commitments under 2016-2020 FSDS

In October 2016, the Federal Government approved the three year FSDS for Canada entitled "Achieving a Sustainable Future".  The CBSA is contributing to the delivery of three of the goals in this plan as outlined below.

This DSDS will cover the period of 2017-2020.

(Bracketed pages make direct reference to the FSDS)

FSDS Goal 2 – Low Carbon Government

Long-Term Goal: The Government of Canada leads by example by making its operations low-carbon

FSDS Targets (pg. 22)

  • Reduce Green House Gas (GHG) emissions from federal government buildings and fleets by 40% below 2005 levels by 2030, with an aspiration to achieve it by 2025*

*Achieving this target is dependent on major capital investments.

FSDS Indicator(s) (pg. 77)

  • Percentage change in energy related GHG emissions from facilities and fleets relative to fiscal year 2005-2006

Canada's Starting Point (pg. 22)

  • To measure our progress on achieving low-carbon government, we track GHG emissions from our operations.
  • As of 2014–2015, responsible departments and agencies have reduced GHG emissions from their buildings and fleets by 4.6% relative to fiscal year 2005–2006. This amount has since been revised to 15%, based on internationally accepted best practices in accounting for GHG emissions.

FSDS Milestone supported by the CBSA (pg. 22)

  • Be an early adopter of building standards to be established through the pan-Canadian framework on clean growth and climate change for all new government buildings and leases, where applicable
  • Establish a complete and public inventory of federal GHG emissions and energy use
  • Encourage departments to take action to innovate sustainable workplace practices
  • Review procurement practices to align with green objectives

Key Priority supported by the CBSA (pg. 23)

  • Our Ports of Entry and office buildings are the largest source of emissions from our operations, and they will be our key focus in reducing these emissions.

Contribution Action (pg. 23)

  • Improve the energy efficiency in our buildings (1.1 to 1.6 below)
  • Modernize our fleet (1.7 and 1.8 below)
  • Support the transition to a low-carbon economy through green procurement (1.9 and 1.10 below)

To green our operations, we will reduce energy use in our buildings and fleets, better understand the GHG emissions across all of our operations, from all sources, and examine ways to build our resilience. Specifically, for each of the Contributing Actions noted above, the CBSA has the following departmental actions planned for 2017 – 2020.

Contributing actions

1. Improve the energy efficiency of our buildings (pg. 23)

Be an early adopter of building standards to be established through the pan-Canadian framework on clean growth and climate change; retrofit workplaces to reduce energy consumption and GHG emissions. And, on a voluntary basis, departments will purchase clean power for their facilities.

Departmental actions

The CBSA has set an 11% emissions reduction target by 2020 (1.1% reduction per year).  Along with other federal departments and agencies, the CBSA submits annual greenhouse gas inventories on energy-use data to contribute to the monitoring of the Government of Canada's progress toward reducing emissions.  The first CBSA inventory, along with a management strategy and action plan was reported in 2007 as part of the CBSA's sustainable development strategy 2007-2009.

The CBSA's current (Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Energy) management plan aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and:

  1. Enhance energy efficiency in new construction, major renovation projects and existing buildings by improving lighting, mechanical systems, building envelopes and energy management
  2. Develop a "Green Team" to initiate action on reducing CBSA's carbon footprint
  3. Expand inventory tracking and revise CBSA's design guides to incorporate energy efficiency requirements
  4. Environmental requirements to be established and funded as part of the typical project delivery process to promote sustainable operations and achieve aggressive GHG emission reductions
  5. Achieve superior energy conservation by conducting energy audits and retrofits as a whole building or port of entry (POE) approach
  6. Implement Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC's) and capitalize on turn-key opportunities without up front capital costs
  7. Continue CBSA's efforts regarding vehicle fleet optimization and modernization
  8. Explore investments on car and light truck fleet vehicles to extend life expectancy and increase fuel efficiency
  9. Commit to a minimum of four percent (4%) fleet replacement during 2017/20 (approximately 40 vehicles)
  10. Maintain a strong commitment to long-term fleet management plans
  11. Expand potential environmental considerations directly related to our mandate by implementing vehicular idling policies and best practices at border crossings to reduce GHG emissions
  12. Purchase and use energy-efficient equipment
Implementation Strategy

The CBSA will report annually on the greenhouse gas emissions inventory using the Federal Greenhouse Gas tracking protocol

Performance indicators

The CBSA Greenhouse gas emissions reductions of 1.1% per year from buildings and fleet relative to fiscal year 2015-2016, expressed as a percentage

Link to Program Inventory Timeline Office of Primary Interest
Internal Services Annually

National Real Property and Accommodations Directorate

Strategic Procurement and Materiel Management

Expected results

The CBSA reduces departmental gas emissions thereby improving energy efficiency of buildings and fleet.

2. Support the transition to a low carbon economy through green procurement

Support clean technologies and green products and services by taking environmental considerations into account in purchasing decisions that involve major investments.

Departmental actions

The Government of Canada Policy on Green Procurement was launched in 2006.

The policy requires that the federal government procure, operate and dispose of its assets in a manner that protects the environment and supports sustainable development objectives. It applies to all federal government procurement activities (goods, services, construction) and integrates environmental considerations into federal government business practices.

It promotes the selection of goods and services that are based on more than cost alone – quality, environmental performance and availability must also be factored into procurement decisions.

By providing reflection on environmental considerations for major procurement investments, assessments will lean towards the selection of goods and services based on life-cycle of a product or asset.

In order to support green procurement, the CBSA will:

Objective

Continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement in accordance with the Federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Implementation Strategy

The CBSA maintains its efforts regarding green procurement that furthers the implementation of the Federal Policy on Green Procurement

Performance indicators
Performance indicators Targets
Specialists in procurement and materiel management completing the Canada School of Public Service green procurement course or equivalent in the given fiscal year 80%
Percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel management who have performance management agreements which contribute to the Green Procurement Approach in the given fiscal year 100%
Percentage of photocopier purchases replaced by multi-functional devices to reduce the environmental impact associated with the life-cycle of equipment 50%
Percentage of workstation reconfiguration projects in PWSGC occupancy within Headquarters using Workplace 2.0 compliant remanufactured or existing re-used furniture componentry (either CBSA-owned or OGC transferred) 50%
Link to Program Inventory Timeline Office of Primary Interest
Internal Services Annually

Strategic Procurement and Material Management, Comptrollership

FSDS Goal 9 – Healthy Wildlife Population

Long-Term Goal: All species have healthy and viable populations

FSDS Targets (pg. 52)

  • By 2020, species that are secure remain secure, and populations of species at risk listed under federal law exhibit trends that are consistent with recovery strategies and management plans.

FSDS Indicator(s) (pg. 78)

  • Species at risk population trends
  • General status of species in Canada

Canada's Starting Point (pg. 52)

To measure our progress in conserving wildlife species, we track the percentage assessed as secure or at-risk; the success of efforts to help them recover; and their risk of disappearing from Canada. Among wild species assessed in 2010, 77% were ranked 'secure.' In addition, as of May 2015:

  • 688 wildlife species had been assessed as endangered, threatened or of special concern. Of the 436 species that had been assessed more than once, 66% showed no change between the two most recent assessments: 14% were in a lower-risk category, and 19% were in a higher-risk category.
  • Of 112 species at risk with recovery strategies or management plans in place, and whose population-oriented goals had been reassessed, 38% showed population trends consistent with the goals of the recovery strategies.

FSDS Milestone supported by the CBSA (pg. 52)

  • Species at risk exhibit stabilizing or improving trends since their listing

Key Priority supported by the CBSA (pg. 53)

  • Work under this goal will support progress toward the 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets for Canada and the global conservation objectives of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity – in particular by ensuring that needed recovery strategies and management plans are in place, and by helping to prevent impacts from invasive alien species.

Contribution Action (pg. 53)

  • Use legislation and regulations to control invasive alien species

Specifically, to protect and conserve wildlife in Canada, the CBSA will continue to implement the following:

Contributing Action

  1. Develop and implement a risk analysis framework and a pathways approach to regulating invasive alien species in Canada.
  2. Prevent the introduction and rapid dispersal of invasive species and disease into Canada via land, air and marine ports of entry.

Departmental actions

The CBSA works in partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to improve the interception of live, forest-insect pests in wood packaging and to ensure compliance at the border with the CFIA's legislation and regulations with respect to plant and animal health. The CBSA also works with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and Canadian provinces to prevent aquatic invasive species, such as Asian carp and zebra mussels, from entering Canada, and with Environment and Climate Change Canada to prevent the introduction into Canada of invasive terrestrial animals and wild animal diseases.

Invasive Alien Species

Objectives:  By 2020, pathways of invasive alien species introductions are identified and risk-based intervention or management plans are in place for priority pathways and species.

Implementation Strategy

Prevent the introduction and rapid dispersal of invasive species and disease into Canada via land, air and marine ports of entry, thus reducing potential harmful impacts on ecosystems, economies and society

Performance indicators
  • Wood Packaging Material Pathways
    • Number of commercial containers inspected for wood-packaging material
    • Number of interceptions of live pests in wood-packaging material
    • Number of containers ordered removed from Canada for reasons of non-compliance with phytosanitary requirements for wood-packaging material
    • Percentage of containers inspected for wood-packaging materials that are compliant with phytosanitary requirements
  • Soil Pathways
    • Number of shipments inspected for goods contaminated with soil
    • Number of shipments contaminated with soil ordered removed from Canada
    • Number of shipments contaminated with soil cleaned or cleaned and disinfected (and released into Canada)
  • Food, Plant and Animal non-compliant commodities
    • Number and nature of interceptions of non-compliant food, plant and animal goods
    • Number of food, plant and animal investigations resulting in convictions
Link to Program Inventory Timeline Office of Primary Interest

Admissibility Determination

Highway, air, rail and marine modes
Annually

Program and Policy Management Division, Commercial Program Directorate

Expected results
  • Prevent the introduction of invasive alien species into Canada
  • Increase compliance for food, plant and animal regulated goods
  • Enhance probability of interception of food, plant and animal regulated goods

FSDS Goal 11 – Sustainable Food

Long-Term Goal: Innovation and ingenuity contribute to a world-leading agricultural sector and food economy for the benefit of all Canadians

FSDS Targets (pg. 60)

  • Ensure safe and accessible food supply by mitigating risks to animal and plant resources from pests, diseases and other health hazards and prevent risks to health of Canadians.

FSDS Indicator(s) (pg. 78)

  • Water quality and soil quality agri-environmental metrics

Canada's Starting Point (pg. 61)

To measure the extent to which agriculture in Canada is managed sustainably, we track many indicators which include water and soil quality. In 2011, the Soil Quality Agri-Environmental Performance Index results for Canada's farming regions were within the "good" range (77) and the Water Quality index was also rated as "good" (74). The historical baselines from 1981 for these metrics were in the "desired" range for water quality (92) and the "good" range for soil quality (64).

FSDS Milestone supported by the CBSA (pg. 60)

  • In 2016-2020, continue delivering programs to improve soil and water quality and increase habitat capacity in agricultural working landscapes.  Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada will be undergoing a funding renewal in Year Three of the 2016-2020 FSDS, which could have implications for actions contributing to this milestone.

Key Priority supported by the CBSA (pg. 61)

  • Work under this goal will support progress toward the 2020 Biodiversity Goals and Targets for Canada and the global conservation objectives of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity – in particular by improving the level of biodiversity and wildlife habitat capacity on agricultural lands, and maintaining or improving water and soil quality.

Contribution Action (pg. 62)

  • Work with partners to address invasive alien species

To ensure safe, sustainable and secure food, we need to protect food systems from threats to animal health and plant resources, such as diseases, pests and invasive alien species. In support of this Goal, the CBSA will continue to deliver on the work detailed in Goal 9 above.

Contributing action

Work with partners to address invasive alien species (pg. 62)

The CBSA will work with international and domestic partners to prevent the introduction and limit the spread of invasive alien species and develop international standards and processes that reflect Canadian interests. For example, work with the US and other countries to ensure compliance with Canadian phytosanitary regulations and share information on best practices and compliance rates. 

Departmental actions

The CBSA works in partnership with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to improve the interception of live, forest-insect pests in wood packaging and to ensure compliance at the border with the CFIA's legislation and regulations with respect to plant and animal health. The CBSA also works with the Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) and Canadian provinces to prevent aquatic invasive species, such as Asian carp and zebra mussels, from entering Canada, and with Environment and Climate Change Canada to prevent the introduction into Canada of invasive terrestrial animals and wild animal diseases.

See previous table for link to program inventory, expected results, performance indicators

Section 3 – Additional Agency Sustainable Development Activities and Initiatives

Departmental actions

In addition to the contributing activities that support the Federal Sustainable Development Strategy, the CBSA will continue to focus on the environmental performance of its real property assets.

As a real property custodian, the CBSA is responsible for considering sustainable design approaches at all of its facilities.  The sustainable design approach to building, construction and operations includes the building and its property and place in the community as a whole system.  Green buildings require less energy to operate, reduce emissions and pollutants, conserve water, generate less solid waste and have decreased operation and maintenance costs.  They also provide healthier and more productive workplaces.

In support of the sustainable design approach, the CBSA will continue to implement its Real Property Sustainability Toolkit to foster improved decision making when constructing, commissioning, operating or dismantling a building.  The toolkit includes a framework, checklist and policy suite.  It encourages a healthy, sustainably designed workplace that promotes the well-being and productivity of employees and the communities in which they work.

Implementation Strategy

The CBSA will continue to use the Real Property Sustainability Framework to define its custodian's approach to managing the environmental performance of new construction, build-to-lease projects, major renovations, operation and maintenance of existing CBSA-owned buildings and new lease or lease renewal projects over 1,000 m2

Performance indicators
  • Percentage of existing CBSA-owned buildings and new lease or lease renewal projects (over 1,000 m2), and associated floor space (m2), assessed for environmental performance using industry-recognized assessment tools (BOMA BEST).
  • Percentage of existing CBSA-owned buildings and new lease or lease renewal projects (over 1,000 m2), and associated floor space (m2), achieving an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance (Green Globe – 3 Globes)
  • Total number of fit-up and refit projects achieving an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance
Link to Program Inventory Timeline Office of Primary Interest

Internal Services

Annually

National Real Property and Accommodations, Comptrollership

Expected results

An industry-recognized level of high environmental performance will be achieved in Government of Canada real property projects and operations

Section 4 – Sustainable Development Decision Making

The relationship that exists between the CBSA's mandate and the pillars of sustainable development places the Agency in a unique position to advance sustainability within the Government of Canada.

Economic Pillar:

The Agency plays a fundamental role in maintaining Canada's economic prosperity.  We promote trade and economic benefits by administering trade legislation and agreements.  We enforce trade remedies that help protect Canadian industry from the injurious effects of dumped and subsidized imported goods, and we collect applicable duties and taxes on imported goods.  Pre-approved programs – NEXUS, FAST and eManifest – allow the Agency to minimize resources dedicated to traders and travellers that have demonstrated a sufficient level of "trust", so that enforcement efforts can be focused on those deemed higher risk.  By facilitating Canada's international business and trade, the CBSA contributes significantly to Canada's economic prosperity.

Social Pillar:

The CBSA contributes to a sustainable society by protecting the health and safety of all Canadians by enforcing legislation that ensures only those people and goods deemed admissible are granted entry into Canada.  We also help protect the health of Canadians by restricting the entry of hazardous products and goods that may have a negative impact on food safety, thus ensuring a secure society for Canadians.

Vision:

The CBSA manages sustainable development change in two different ways – physical and behavioural. The physical includes ways in which the environment is impacted, such as measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption and waste. Any change to the physical environment usually occurs as a result of infrastructure innovation and technology-based intervention.

Behavioural change requires that management play a leadership role to engage employees in new ways of thinking about how the CBSA operates. The key areas – invasive alien species, greenhouse gas emissions, green procurement – are influenced by forging partnerships and encouraging open communications with employees at all levels. A sustainable workplace flourishes when employees share opportunities and adopt practices that contribute to sustainable solutions.

Approach:

The CBSA recognizes the need for a comprehensive and consistent approach to enable change. A management-led approach to help employees reach Agency performance targets has been put forth to drive daily operations toward more sustainable practices. The five action words are enable – engage – exemplify – encourage and ensure. Known as the Sustainable Workplace Approach, these guiding principles will direct sustainable development integration across the CBSA.

The overarching Sustainable Workplace Approach is key to sustainable development delivery. Recognizing the synergy and interconnectedness of priority areas underscores the need for strong leadership and participation at all levels. Accountability for delivery ultimately rests with senior management. Responsibility, however, rests with all employees.

Section 5 – Strategic Environmental Assessments

Under the Cabinet Directive on the Environmental Assessment of Policy, Plan and Program Proposals, the CBSA completes a strategic environmental assessment for all proposed policies, plans, programs or projects that may result in lasting cumulative environmental effects.  The purpose of the assessment is to identify and address environmental issues in context with economic and social considerations.  Once reviewed and approved by the Agency's senior management, strategic environmental assessments are submitted through Memoranda to Cabinet and Treasury Board Submission processes prior to commencing work.

The strategic environmental assessment is a mechanism for becoming more efficient and for enabling a more rigorous integration of environmental issues into agency business.  It is not intended to serve as a stand-alone analysis, but to be integrated with other processes and to provide real-time feedback at all stages. 

In addition, the CBSA uses a decision making matrix designed to address sustainable development issues around business planning and operations.  It comprises a series of trigger questions to be considered prior to the onset of any policy, program or operation, and it is intended to advance analytical thinking and to generate suggestions for improvement and/or mitigation of potentially unsustainable components.  The goal of the decision-making matrix is to create awareness and build capacity for informed decision making, and to instil an approach that intuitively positions sustainable development management at the forefront of all business practices.

The CBSA will continue to ensure that its decision-making process includes consideration of FSDS goals and targets through the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) process. An SEA for policy, plan or program proposals includes an analysis of the impacts of the given proposal on the environment, including on FSDS goals and targets.

Public statements on the results of the CBSA's assessments will be made public when an initiative is announced. The purpose of the public statement is to demonstrate that the environmental effects, including the impacts on achieving the FSDS goals and targets, of the approved policy, plan or program have been considered during proposal development and decision making.

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